New Zealand markets close in 6 hours 49 minutes
  • NZX 50

    11,728.47
    -7.03 (-0.06%)
     
  • NZD/USD

    0.6242
    -0.0059 (-0.93%)
     
  • ALL ORDS

    7,250.30
    +42.80 (+0.59%)
     
  • OIL

    88.38
    -0.63 (-0.71%)
     
  • GOLD

    1,790.20
    -1.00 (-0.06%)
     

Ariana DeBose Says 'My Country Is at War with Me' After Abortion Ruling, Marriage Equality Threats

·3-min read
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JUNE 12: Ariana DeBose attends the 75th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 12, 2022 in New York City. (Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JUNE 12: Ariana DeBose attends the 75th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 12, 2022 in New York City. (Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images)

Dia Dipasupil/Getty Ariana DeBose

Ariana DeBose is speaking out amid the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling against the constitutional right to abortion and Justice Clarence Thomas' concurring opinion about contraception and gay rights.

DeBose, 31, appeared on The Tonight Show Thursday, telling host Jimmy Fallon, "I'm Black, I'm Afro-Latina, I'm a woman and I'm queer. My country is at war with me, and that's hard."

"Clarence Thomas was very clear on what his plan is. He's not just coming for women — they already came for voting rights, they're gonna continue," the Oscar winner said. "But they're coming for marriage equality. And, quite frankly, they'll probably come for adoption rights, by same-sex couples."

"So this is the time to get in the fight, and it starts on a local level," she said. "So find ways to get involved."

DeBose later shared a clip from her interview on Twitter, writing, "This is not about one set of rights. This is about human rights. Find your local abortion fund and consider donating monthly at abortionfund.org."

Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE's free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer, from juicy celebrity news to compelling human-interest stories.

RELATED: Ariana DeBose Says She Doesn't Like Labels Regarding Sexuality: "I Prefer the Term Human"

SCOTUS made the 6-to-3 decision last week to overturn Roe v. Wade, reversing nearly 50 years of legal precedent. The ruling will completely change the landscape of women's reproductive rights by giving individual states the power to decide whether to allow abortion. It is estimated that nearly half the country will enact near-total bans in the coming months.

Since the decision, states such as Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri and South Dakota have already banned abortion after putting "trigger bans" in place that governors enacted after the Supreme Court ruling.

In Thomas' concurring opinion on the Roe ruling, he wrote that the Supreme Court should reconsider Griswold v. Connecticut, Lawrence v. Texas and Obergefell v. Hodges — the rulings that currently protect the right to buy and use contraceptives without government restriction, the right to a same-sex relationship and the right to same-sex marriage.

In Lawrence v. Texas, the court ruled that criminal punishments for those who commit sodomy are unconstitutional.

RELATED VIDEO: Roe v. Wade Overturned by SCOTUS: "We Can Only Talk About What Roe v. Wade Protected, Past Tense"

DeBose, meanwhile, made history as the first Afro-Latina actress and the first openly queer woman of color to win an Oscar in an acting category when she clinched the Best Supporting Actress statuette at the 94th Academy Awards earlier this year, for her performance in West Side Story.

During her Oscars speech, DeBose spoke to her identity and how her art helped her come into her own.

"Imagine this little girl in the backseat of a white Ford Focus," she said. "Look into her eyes, you see a queer — openly queer — woman of color, Afro-Latina who found her strength in life through art, and that's what I believe we are here to celebrate."

On the PEOPLE Every Day podcast last month, the actress explained that rather than particular labels, "I prefer the term human because your humanity can be described in a myriad of ways, but it does not change the fact that you are human."

"The fullness of who you are, what it's like to be queer, out, Latina, Afro-Latina, biracial, or multiracial, however you want to identify ... we are moving towards a space where I think it is now more widely accepted to hear all of those labels wrapped up into one person," DeBose added.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting