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Dua Lipa feels proud of Kosovo

·2-min read


Dua Lipa feels proud of her family roots.
The 26-year-old pop star was born and raised in London, but her family hail from the Balkans and Dua thinks it's a "big part" of her identity.
She explained: "It's such a big part of who I am. Given my parents and how they came to the U.K., [the refugee situation] has always been something that's really close to my heart."
Dua - who lived in Kosovo during her teens - won't allow anyone to deny her "identity".
She told WSJ. Magazine: "I read a lot of comments from people telling me that I don't have a country, I don't have an identity, Kosovo doesn't exist.
"I lived in Kosovo, I know the lives that were lost [during the war]. So for somebody to deny me my identity and my experience, it's hard for me to stand back and not speak up about it. So that's something that I will always do."
The 'Levitating' hitmaker previously revealed that she loved her time in Kosovo and that she felt safer there than she did in London.
Dua explained: "I got to Kosovo and I really loved it there. It’s way safer than London. There was a sense of community and safeness - everyone knows everyone in Kosovo, especially in Pristina."
Dua "learned a lot" from her time in Kosovo and she also has fond memories of her time at school.
She recalled: "I was the youngest in my year, which was different and exciting. It was fun, we’d go out to the city centre and they’d show me around, I learned a lot from being there.
"My parents felt a lot more comfortable letting me go out with my friends, as long as I was back by a certain time."

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