New Zealand markets closed
  • NZX 50

    12,197.15
    +44.99 (+0.37%)
     
  • NZD/USD

    0.6330
    -0.0144 (-2.23%)
     
  • NZD/EUR

    0.5856
    -0.0069 (-1.17%)
     
  • ALL ORDS

    7,771.80
    +43.30 (+0.56%)
     
  • ASX 200

    7,558.10
    +46.50 (+0.62%)
     
  • OIL

    73.23
    -2.65 (-3.49%)
     
  • GOLD

    1,865.90
    -50.40 (-2.63%)
     
  • NASDAQ

    12,573.36
    -229.78 (-1.79%)
     
  • FTSE

    7,901.80
    +81.64 (+1.04%)
     
  • Dow Jones

    33,926.01
    -127.93 (-0.38%)
     
  • DAX

    15,476.43
    -32.76 (-0.21%)
     
  • Hang Seng

    21,660.47
    -297.89 (-1.36%)
     
  • NIKKEI 225

    27,509.46
    +107.41 (+0.39%)
     
  • NZD/JPY

    83.0100
    -0.2030 (-0.24%)
     

Herschel Walker Faces New Allegations of Violence, Infidelity from Former Girlfriends

Heisman Trophy winner and Republican candidate for US Senate Herschel Walker speaks at a rally on May 23, 2022 in Athens, Georgia. Tomorrow is the Primary Election Day in the state of Georgia.
Heisman Trophy winner and Republican candidate for US Senate Herschel Walker speaks at a rally on May 23, 2022 in Athens, Georgia. Tomorrow is the Primary Election Day in the state of Georgia.

Megan Varner/Getty

Five women who say they previously had romantic relationships with Republican Senate candidate Herschel Walker now say he is unfit for office, with one ex-girlfriend telling The Daily Beast in an explosive new report that he "cannot have control over a state when he has little to no control of his mind."

Among the women who spoke to the outlet was Cheryl Parsa, who described a five-year relationship with the former football star in the 2000s. Walker, Parsa says, demonstrated "unstable" behavior, and exhibited what she called "little to no control" over his violent actions.

Parsa told the Beast that Walker — whose spokesperson did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's request for comment — is "a pathological liar" who "knows how to manipulate his disease, in order to manipulate people, while at times being simultaneously completely out of control."

"He is not well," Parsa added. "And I say that as someone who knows exactly what this looks like, because I have lived through it and seen what it does to him and to other people. He cannot be a senator. He cannot have control over a state when he has little to no control of his mind."

RELATED: Political Ad Features Herschel Walker's Ex-Wife Describing When He Allegedly Held a Gun to Her Head

Parsa also described a 2005 incident in which she caught Walker cheating on her with another woman at his condo in Dallas. When caught, she said she thought Walker "was going to beat me," and alleged that he threw out his fists toward her and put his hands on her neck.

"I saw a fist flying toward me. As I ducked down, he hit the wall beside my head and staggered backwards toward the bedroom, saying, 'COME ON! I'M GONNA SHOW YOU WHAT A MAN IS!' And I heard him from the bedroom beating himself up against the wall repeatedly and with force," she claimed.

Parsa and others interviewed by the Beast paint a picture of a man who is both unstable and unfaithful, allegedly using multiple cellphones and enlisting the help of a hotel desk clerk in an effort to keep his affairs straight.

RELATED: Georgia's Republican Lieutenant Governor Says He Didn't Vote for Herschel Walker or Raphael Warnock in Senate Runoff

Walker, who will face off against Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock in a Georgia runoff election next week, has seen his campaign plagued with controversy as several women have come forward to allege abuse or to claim that he pressured them to have abortions when they became pregnant with his children.

Walker's ex-wife, Cindy DeAngelis Grossman, has previously gone public to describe the alleged abuse she experienced at the hands of the former football star — abuse that Walker has not disputed, though he has claimed he doesn't remember the incidents.

In a 30-second ad that debuted in August and was paid for by the Republican Accountability PAC, Gossman said Walker's "eyes would become very evil" when he was angry, adding, "The first time he held the gun to my head … he held the gun to my temple and said he was going to blow my brains out."

Grossman's allegations against her ex-husband are not new, and court records show she received a protective order in 2005, three years after the couple divorced.

"I'm troubled by my actions and will always deeply regret any pain I've caused Cindy," Walker said at the time, PEOPLE previously reported.

RELATED: Herschel Walker Abortion Accuser Releases New Evidence, Including Voice Messages: 'I Am Telling the Truth'

The couple's son, right-wing social media personality Christian Walker, has also claimed that Walker threatened to kill he and his mother, writing in a tweet: "You're not a 'family man' when you left us to bang a bunch of women, threatened to kill us, and had us move over 6 times in 6 months running from your violence."

In another tweet, Christian wrote: "I don't care about someone who has a bad past and takes accountability. But how DARE YOU LIE and act as though you're some 'moral, Christian, upright man.' You've lived a life of DESTROYING other peoples lives. How dare you."

Christian posted a follow-up video the next day in which he doubled down on his claims and said of his father's campaign, "Everything has been a lie."

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

RELATED: Herschel Walker's Son Christian Breaks Ties with Father amid Tense Ga. Senate Run: 'Everything Has Been a Lie'

Walker — who is now remarried — has publicly acknowledged that he has struggled with dissociative identity disorder (DID), writing in his 2008 book Breaking Free: My Life with Dissociative Identity Disorder that he developed a dozen alter-egos to combat the bullying he suffered as a child.

He has also publicly acknowledged at least some violent tendencies, describing in his memoir, as well as in public events since, an instance in which he allegedly armed himself with a handgun and drove to meet a delivery driver, who was late with the delivery of a custom car, with the intention of killing him.

Walker didn't go through with it, he has said, because he saw a "honk if you love Jesus" bumper sticker on the man's car.

Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE's free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer.

Parsa told the Beast that she began attending therapy sessions with Walker in 2005, alleging that the therapist told her Walker's DID was "the worst case [he'd] ever seen."

"He said the only thing worse than having DID is Herschel Walker having DID," Parsa added.

In a campaign ad that came out in October, Walker said he had "overcome" his mental illness, but Parsa told the Beast that the alternate personalities she witnessed in Walker during their time together hasn't gone away, saying she has noticed behavioral changes watching his campaign from afar.

"I am once again witnessing the child alters who cannot construct a complete sentence on the national stage, now speaking out on issues like gun violence and environmental issues," Parsa said, a reference to campaign appearances in which he made incoherent remarks about both issues. "Personally, it is so sad to watch, and even more scary for our country."

RELATED: Ga. Senate Candidate Herschel Walker Invents His Own Science to Try and Explain Air Pollution

The therapist himself did not dispute the claims to the Beast, though the outlet notes he has previously spoken publicly about Walker's violent behavior in his office, including for a 2011 Playboy interview in which he said the football star once threatened to kill him and everyone else in his office.

"That incident ended with him hitting the door and breaking his fist," the therapist told Playboy at the time.

In that same story, Walker described how he stayed at a California psychiatric hospital for three weeks as an outpatient, telling Playboy: "For the first couple of days, you say to yourself, 'I'm not like these people here. I'm not like these people.' Then, all of a sudden, it hit me. I was just like those people. The diagnosis was right — is right. That's what it was. That's what it is."

If you are experiencing domestic violence, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233, or go to thehotline.org. All calls are toll-free and confidential. The hotline is available 24/7 in more than 170 languages.