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JB Hi-Fi customer slams store for selling 'used' game as new

The gamer was not happy after paying full price.

An Aussie customer has vented after receiving two video games in an "extremely used condition" despite paying full price for a "brand-new" copy.

The disgruntled gamer said he placed an online order for the limited-edition Alfred Hitchcock Vertigo game for the Nintendo Switch from JB Hi-Fi and paid $30 for a brand-new version. However, he received a copy in a battered box with what appeared to be a damaged cartridge.

"Long story short, I got two games delivered. Both are in extremely USED condition," he shared on Reddit.

Game from JB Hi-Fi that has been used
The JB Hi-Fi customer said the game came with a damaged box and cartridge. (Source: Reddit)

"I've done a direct complaint, probably be going in store today to see what's up. Just blows my mind, because I paid the 'brand-new' price but they came in heavily used condition. It's like I got some used leftovers or something."

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Have you received damaged goods despite paying for a brand-new item? Let us know at yahoo.finance.au@yahooinc.com

While some Redditors sympathised with the unhappy shopper, others believed the gamer was overreacting and should just contact JB Hi-Fi and ask for a refund.

One said Vertigo was a discontinued product so there probably wouldn't have been many copies in stock at the customer's local store and the game was probably a display version.

To this point, another added, "To add on top of this, if it was gutted for display, it cannot be sold as brand-new. Doing so can cop you a million-dollar fine."

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"Ask them about the change of mind policy as others have said, mentioning the ombudsman usually gets companies to do the right thing," another Redditor wrote.

Someone else commented,:"That’s 100 per cent a used game. Send these pictures to their customer complaints email and request a new one."

"I've had this happen many times ... damaged and cracked cases," a fellow gamer said. "When I complain to them, every time it's, 'Take it back to your nearest store for exchange or refund'. Not helpful, I live rural and the nearest store is 100s of kms away, hence why I order online."

JB Hi-Fi storefront; Sign on JB Hi-Fi floor
A gamer has slammed JB Hi-Fi over a 'new' copy of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo that appeared to have been used. (Source: Getty)

On its website, the company states: "JB Hi-Fi or the manufacturer will determine, at no cost to the customer, whether the product is faulty and the cause of the fault within a reasonable time frame.

“In the event of a fault and if the product is determined faulty through no fault of the customer, then the customer can request an exchange or refund of the original purchase price.”

Businesses should not make false representations: ACCC

However, according to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), businesses have to be upfront about the quality of goods they are providing.

"When supplying goods or services, businesses should not make any false or misleading representations in relation to the origin of goods, or their quality, value, price or age," an ACCC spokesperson told Yahoo Finance.

"Products and services supplied to consumers automatically come with consumer guarantees under the Australian Consumer Law.

"These guarantees include: products (including delivered products) are of acceptable quality and fit for a particular purpose, and any description of a product by a business must be accurate, whether written or spoken.

"Consumers have the right to return a product if they think there’s a problem.

"The product does not have to be in its original packaging, but a business is entitled to ask consumers to provide some form of proof of purchase, such as a receipt or a credit card statement.

"If a consumer is unable to resolve the issue with the business directly, they can contact their local state or territory consumer protection agency, who may be able to assist.”

Yahoo Finance reached out to JB Hi-Fi and was told: "The customer will need to fill out an enquiry on our website and submit."

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