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Singer Michael Bublé sees return to normal for live music after COVID-19, 'whatever that normal is'

Brooke DiPalma
·Associate Producer
·3-min read

As the lights on Broadway remain dark and concert venues across most of the globe remain empty, Michael Bublé has no doubt the music and entertainment industry will return — when it’s safe.

In the U.S., the latest coronavirus relief package provided $15 billion dollars of relief for entertainment venues like music theaters and concerns halls, in addition to museums and galleries, to “weather a crisis that has closed theaters and silenced halls.” Meanwhile, the industry has seen a flood of fundraisers dedicated to helping financially-strapped businesses and workers.

“There's as great or greater hunger for music than there's ever been,” the Canadian singer told Yahoo Finance in a wide ranging interview recently. “There's a necessity. I mean, music brings us together in uncertain times. It always has, it always will.”

While it may be hard to see it right now, Bublé believes that “things are going to get back to a normal, whatever that normal is.”

Last week, the signer was forced to reschedule his “An Evening With Michael Bublé” Tour for the second time, moving it to August 13. In the meantime, Bublé has spent every day relishing being with his children.

“It's been the greatest time of my life...in other years, I would have been out on the road...I probably would have missed my daughter walking for the first time or the first word or a lot of things, birthdays and I have been there for every, every second,” he said.

He believes when the time is right, and the COVID-19 vaccine becomes widely available, people across the globe will jump at the opportunity to come together once again.

“When we look back, I hope that we learned so many valuable lessons about about how to treat each other, how to love each other and I hope we learn about mercy." Michael Bublè

“This comes it gets down to a very basic level in humanity. Humans are not supposed to be alone,” Bublé explained.

“We are supposed to congregate, we're built to be in church together, we're built to eat together, to speak together, to cry together, to love together. And so there's no possible way that we won't continue something that is inherently human,” he added.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 07: Michael Buble performs at Qudos Bank Arena on February 07, 2020 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Don Arnold/WireImage)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - FEBRUARY 07: Michael Buble performs at Qudos Bank Arena on February 07, 2020 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Don Arnold/WireImage)

Yet he echoed the sentiments of health experts that say mask wearing protocols will probably outlast the lockdowns associated with the virus.

“I mean, we'll have to find safer ways... will people wear masks? Probably. Will I wear a mask? Probably,” he said.

But that’s certainly not the only aspect that he hopes to take with him from this unprecedented time of isolation and turmoil.

“When we look back, I hope that we learned so many valuable lessons about about how to treat each other, how to love each other and I hope we learn about mercy,” Bublé said, citing his experience with friends who have suffered hardships — including lost family members.

Throughout this hard time though, he says he’s aimed “to be really self aware,” noting not all celebrities have been. “It's a rotten time to be a celebrity, because of a lack of self awareness that so many have showed through a time when I think we need to be at our most sensitive,” the singer told Yahoo Finance.

Brooke DiPalma is a producer and reporter for Yahoo Finance. Follow her on Twitter at @BrookeDiPalma.

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