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Premier promises to unite divided Qld

 

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has appealed to traditional Liberal voters to vote Labor "just this one time" on Saturday to help her bring a divided state together.

On the final day of the election campaign, Ms Palaszczuk hammered home her claim that a vote for the Liberal National Party was also a vote for One Nation.

Looking to be the first woman in Australian politics to win two elections, she reached out to LNP voters by calling on them to consider giving Labor a chance if they were uncomfortable with a possible alliance with One Nation.

"To those thinking of voting Liberal your vote counts. Every vote counts," Ms Palaszczuk said.

"Your choice is to support a One Nation coalition or, just this one time, to vote Labor for a strong, stable majority government."

With Labor leading in the latest polls, the only way the LNP is likely to gain power is with the support of Pauline Hanson's party.

Ms Palaszczuk once again said she would rather go into opposition than form a minority government with One Nation or any of the other minor parties.

She also said she would work to govern for all Queenslanders, not just the southeast corner, after polling showed regional Queensland looked set to abandon Labor in favour of the LNP and One Nation.

"We live in such a large state; I have done my best to get out to as much of regional Queensland as possible," she said.

Indeed, the vast majority of Ms Palaszczuk's campaign has been spent outside the southeast corner, however, it hasn't seemed to help with her poll numbers in the regions.

The latest Galaxy poll published in The Courier-Mail on Friday showed Labor leading the LNP two-party-preferred in southeast Queensland 54 to 46 per cent, while the results were flipped in the regions 52 to 48 per cent in favour of the LNP.

It comes after a campaign which has seen Ms Palaszczuk struggle early, before finding her feet in the back half of the race.

Earlier, Ms Palaszczuk likened herself to Robin Hood as she defended four new taxes announced on Thursday.

But the party won't be giving the extra money back to the poor, instead using it to pay down state debt, which is set to rise to $81 billion in 2021.

Ms Palaszczuk said Queenslanders are comfortable with a small number of rich Queenslanders paying more tax.

"I've even been compared to Robin Hood, so I think that's a pretty good comparison," she told ABC Radio

The taxes include a hike for the owners of luxury cars, a new land tax category for large holdings, higher stamp duty for foreign buyers of property, and a new betting tax targeting agencies based outside the state.