Personal Finance Latest News

  • GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security Yahoo Finance - 18 hours ago
    GOP introduces plan to massively cut Social Security

    On Thursday, Rep. Sam Johnson, a Republican from Texas and chair of the Ways and Means Committee, introduced legislation to significantly cut Social Security. The bill introduced by Johnson, who is also the chair of the Social Security subcommittee, slashes benefits, adds means testing, and would raise the retirement age from 67 to 69. For most workers, the bill would cut Social Security benefits substantially.

  • Possible Retirement Policy Changes in a Trump Administration Morningstar - Tue, Dec 6, 2016 7:00 PM NZDT
    Possible Retirement Policy Changes in a Trump Administration

    Contributor Mark Miller takes a look at retirement-related issues that could see action in Washington in the coming year.

  • Richest Americans live seven to 10 years longer than poorest Reuters - Tue, Dec 6, 2016 4:40 AM NZDT
    Richest Americans live seven to 10 years longer than poorest

    By Ronnie Cohen (Reuters Health) - Poverty cuts an average of almost 10 years off American men’s lives and seven off women’s, a new study shows. Then they examined longevity, smoking, obesity, childhood poverty and other health information from the richest and poorest places. Men in the poorest spots died on average nearly 10 years earlier, at 69 years old, than men in the wealthiest ones, and women in the poorest places died on average seven years sooner, at 76 years old, the research team reports in the American Journal of Public Health.

  • The New Retirement-Advice Rule: Where Things Stand The Wall Street Journal - Mon, Dec 5, 2016 5:28 PM NZDT
    The New Retirement-Advice Rule: Where Things Stand

    A new rule that proponents say will protect retirement savers from conflicted advice and inflated fees is looking more likely to be delayed or repealed in the coming months in the wake of Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election. The Labor Department’s so-called fiduciary rule, set to take effect April 10, 2017, requires brokers and others who give retirement advice to act in clients’ best interests. Previous rules required that brokers’ advice merely had to be “suitable” for a retirement investor.

  • What Trump Could Do to Your Retirement Bloomberg - Sat, Dec 3, 2016 5:31 AM NZDT
    What Trump Could Do to Your Retirement

    Defanging the fiduciary rule could cost investors billions of dollars. Critics of the rule say it does more harm than good.

  • 5 things to do by New Year's Eve to lower your tax bill Yahoo Finance - Fri, Dec 2, 2016 7:56 AM NZDT
    5 things to do by New Year's Eve to lower your tax bill

    Charitable donations are an easy way to get a tax deduction, and the most obvious way to make a donation is to write a check. According to the IRS, a donor claiming a deduction of $250 or more is required to obtain and keep a written acknowledgment for a charitable contribution, so be sure to get a donation receipt. Your tax bracket depends on your income.

  • How to Boost Your Social Security Check by 85 Percent Bloomberg - Wed, Nov 30, 2016 11:00 PM NZDT
    How to Boost Your Social Security Check by 85 Percent

    New research shows the pros and cons of waiting to take retirement benefits.

  • Is It Simpler Than Obamacare? California’s Retirement Mandate Bloomberg - Mon, Nov 28, 2016 11:00 PM NZDT
    Is It Simpler Than Obamacare? California’s Retirement Mandate

    The giant state and four others aim to use employers to revolutionize saving for millions of workers.

  • Outdated 401(k) Rules Are Shortchanging Americans Bloomberg - Wed, Nov 23, 2016 3:59 AM NZDT
    Outdated 401(k) Rules Are Shortchanging Americans

    Age requirements and vesting delays may be costing you hundreds of thousands of dollars.

  • Cheer Up America, 1,700 Millionaires Are Minted Every Day Bloomberg - Mon, Nov 21, 2016 11:00 PM NZDT
    Cheer Up America, 1,700 Millionaires Are Minted Every Day

    The biggest generational transfer of wealth in history has begun.

  • DIVIDED AMERICA: Easy retirement? Only for a privileged few Associated Press - Fri, Nov 18, 2016 4:23 AM NZDT
    DIVIDED AMERICA: Easy retirement? Only for a privileged few

    The American dream of a blissful retirement, free of financial worries, is dying. Most U.S. households are heading for a worse lifestyle in retirement than they had while they were working, because they ...

  • 10 Things You Need to Know About Medicare U.S.News & World Report - Wed, Nov 16, 2016 4:43 AM NZDT
    10 Things You Need to Know About Medicare

    Here's how to make the most of your Medicare benefit. Hospital care is covered by Medicare Part A. Medicare Part B is medical insurance that covers doctor's visits and outpatient services. Medicare Advantage Plans or Medicare Part C are an alternative to traditional Medicare offered by private insurance companies, typically with different premiums and restrictions.

  • What the Rich Are Doing Now to Reap Trump’s Tax Bonanza Bloomberg - Tue, Nov 15, 2016 1:00 AM NZDT
    What the Rich Are Doing Now to Reap Trump’s Tax Bonanza

    Even middle-income Americans are moving to profit in 2016 from lower taxes in the future.

  • 6 Ways to Stretch Your Retirement Income Credit.com - Tue, Nov 15, 2016 1:00 AM NZDT
    6 Ways to Stretch Your Retirement Income

    No matter what phase in life you're at, you may want to consider the following cost-cutting measures to help you stretch your retirement income.

  • Medicare premium to rise modestly for most beneficiaries Associated Press - Fri, Nov 11, 2016 11:56 AM NZDT

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare has announced the "Part B" premium for 2017, and for most beneficiaries it's a modest increase.

  • Trump presidency throws retirement advice rule into question Reuters - Thu, Nov 10, 2016 7:03 AM NZDT
    Trump presidency throws retirement advice rule into question

    Republican Donald Trump's victory in the U.S. presidential race puts a new rule on retirement advice in limbo, even after Wall Street's biggest wealth management firms have spent millions preparing for it, lawyers and analysts said on Wednesday. The U.S. Department of Labor fiduciary rule, which is set to start taking effect in April, is meant to promote the best interests of retirement savers by eliminating conflicts of interest for brokers. The financial services industry has tried to stop the rule in the courts, arguing that the Labor Department overreached and that the rule would result in high costs that will ultimately make small accounts unprofitable.

  • 10 Social Security Rules Everyone Should Know U.S.News & World Report - Tue, Nov 8, 2016 6:06 AM NZDT
    10 Social Security Rules Everyone Should Know

    How much you earn and your age when you sign up play a big role in how much you will receive from Social Security. Workers who familiarize themselves with the Social Security rules will be better able to maximize their payments. Pay close attention to these aspects of the program when making Social Security decisions.

  • How Retirement Benefits Will Change in 2017 U.S.News & World Report - Tue, Nov 8, 2016 1:00 AM NZDT

    Financial advisors managing 401(k)s and individual retirement accounts will be required to act in the best interest of their clients beginning in April 2017. There will also be several small tweaks in the rules regarding who qualifies for tax breaks for saving in retirement accounts. Here's a look at some of the important ways retirement benefits will change next year.

  • State and city budget blues: Pressures keep piling up Associated Press - Mon, Nov 7, 2016 11:01 PM NZDT

    It's not just Detroit and Puerto Rico with financial problems. The pressure is rising on local governments around the country that are struggling with big pension obligations and other debts. Five states ...

  • The One Portfolio Move to Make Before Year-End Morningstar - Mon, Nov 7, 2016 7:00 PM NZDT
    The One Portfolio Move to Make Before Year-End

    This simple maneuver can de-risk your portfolio, create in-retirement cash flows, improve your tax position, and more.

  • Why Your 401(k) Fees Aren’t Lower The Wall Street Journal - Mon, Nov 7, 2016 6:11 PM NZDT
    Why Your 401(k) Fees Aren’t Lower

    Indeed, 401(k)s and their menus of funds often are so complex that employees investing in them incur administrative, record-keeping and adviser fees. The 401(k) was “invented by accident,” as a Morningstar report says. Then it morphed into a savings plan when companies decided to get out of the pension business.

  • It’s Time for Your 401(k)’s Annual Physical The Wall Street Journal - Mon, Nov 7, 2016 4:14 PM NZDT
    It’s Time for Your 401(k)’s Annual Physical

    Have you looked at your 401(k) lately? Many are convinced the best thing to do with a retirement plan is not to fiddle with it. “Check it annually,” says Kimberly Foss, founder of Empyrion Wealth Management Inc. in Roseville, Calif., and New York.

  • How to Navigate and Prep for a Surprise Early Retirement The Wall Street Journal - Sat, Nov 5, 2016 6:34 AM NZDT
    How to Navigate and Prep for a Surprise Early Retirement

    Proper planning and maneuvering can help you secure your wealth and health in the event of sudden job loss

  • The Big Winners and Losers in America’s Social Security System The Wall Street Journal - Fri, Oct 28, 2016 10:30 PM NZDT
    The Big Winners and Losers in America’s Social Security System

    What will you receive in Social Security benefits compared with the taxes you pay in? By one estimate, the turning point is currently around $65,000 for a single worker and double that for couples earning similar pay. This question has come up since the Social Security Administration last week announced a payroll-tax increase affecting 12 million higher-income workers.

  • IRA and 401(k) Contribution Limits to Remain the Same in 2017 Money - Fri, Oct 28, 2016 6:48 AM NZDT
    IRA and 401(k) Contribution Limits to Remain the Same in 2017

    It's $5,500 for IRAs and $18,000 for 401(k) for workers younger than 50.

  • For some low-income workers, retirement is only a dream Associated Press - Tue, Oct 25, 2016 12:24 AM NZDT
    For some low-income workers, retirement is only a dream

    CHICAGO (AP) — It was a striking image. A photo of an 89-year-old man hunched over, struggling to push his cart with frozen treats. Fidencio Sanchez works long hours every day selling the treats because he couldn't afford to retire. The photo and his story went viral and thousands of people donated more than $384,000 for his retirement.

  • The Biggest Money Mistakes We Make—Decade by Decade The Wall Street Journal - Mon, Oct 24, 2016 5:50 PM NZDT

    Meanwhile, these days more people are waiting until their 30s to take big plunges like marriage and children. In their 40s, people often fail to pay down a mortgage quickly enough, leaving them covering the costs into retirement. Finally, in our retirement years, we often don’t make an uncomfortable but necessary move—giving family members the power to make big financial decisions for us—even though research shows most of us need that help a lot sooner than we realize.

  • What Happens When There’s a Mistake in Your 401(k) The Wall Street Journal - Mon, Oct 24, 2016 3:10 PM NZDT

    Are you keeping a close eye on your 401(k) and other retirement plans? You should, because employers and plan managers make mistakes—and that can lead to big headaches and out-of-pocket costs for you. Just ask Benjamin Levy, a retired information-technology professional whose former employer erroneously deposited in his 401(k) a portion of a bonus that he received after he retired.

  • You Made a Mistake on Your Tax Return. Should You Amend It? The Wall Street Journal - Mon, Oct 24, 2016 3:08 PM NZDT

    Broadway’s brightest star, Alexander Hamilton, summarized the problem neatly. “In common life, to retract an error even in the beginning is no easy task,” Mr. Hamilton once wrote, according to Ron Chernow’s biography of the nation’s first Treasury secretary. While Mr. Hamilton wasn’t writing about income-tax bloopers, his words undoubtedly will resonate with millions of modern-day taxpayers.

  • Social Security taxes to rise for higher-income Americans The Wall Street Journal - Wed, Oct 19, 2016 8:39 AM NZDT
    Social Security taxes to rise for higher-income Americans

    Higher-income workers will pay more in payroll taxes next year to support Social Security, while retirees and other program beneficiaries see a scant increase in their monthly benefits. Nearly 66 million people, or roughly 1 in 5 Americans, receive Social Security and Supplemental Security Income payments from the U.S. government. Based on subdued inflation over the past two years, their benefits will see a 0.3% cost-of-living increase for 2017 following no adjustment this year, the Social Security Administration said Tuesday.

  • $4 a month? Social Security recipients to get tiny increase Associated Press - Wed, Oct 19, 2016 7:27 AM NZDT
    $4 a month? Social Security recipients to get tiny increase

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of Social Security recipients and federal retirees will get a 0.3 percent increase in monthly benefits next year, the fifth year in a row that older Americans will have to settle for historically low raises. The adjustment adds up to a monthly increase of less than $4 a month for an average recipient.

  • Is it possible to retire in your 30s or 40s? Bankrate.com - Tue, Oct 18, 2016 11:00 PM NZDT
    Is it possible to retire in your 30s or 40s?

    Retiring super early can be a downright dangerous idea, says Mike Lynch, vice president of strategic markets at Hartford Funds. "If you stop funding your retirement and start using it 30 years ahead of schedule," says Lynch, "it is therefore unlikely that you will receive Social Security benefits.

  • When the 4% Rule Fails Morningstar - Tue, Oct 18, 2016 6:00 PM NZDT

    The future could be a lot less happy than the past.

  • 7 Things You Can Do With a My Social Security Account U.S.News & World Report - Tue, Oct 18, 2016 3:10 AM NZDT
    7 Things You Can Do With a My Social Security Account

    A my Social Security account allows you to review your contributions to the Social Security program. You can also get a personalized estimate of how much you will receive if you claim Social Security at various ages. Periodically reviewing your Social Security statement allows you to make sure your earnings are recorded correctly and to factor the likely payout into your retirement plans.

  • What Your Family Needs to Know About Your IRA Distributions Credit.com - Tue, Oct 18, 2016 1:30 AM NZDT
    What Your Family Needs to Know About Your IRA Distributions

    Here's what your family needs to know about your IRA distribution, should you pass away. 

  • Retiring next year? 8 money moves to make now Bankrate.com - Mon, Oct 17, 2016 11:00 PM NZDT
    Retiring next year? 8 money moves to make now

    As life transitions go, retirement ranks way up there among the most challenging, both financially and emotionally. After a lifetime of work, you may have mixed emotions about retirement -- looking forward to not working but nervous about leaving your work identity behind. Because retirement can be so stressful, Jeff Vollmer, a financial adviser with Hyde Park Wealth Management in Cincinnati, advises clients to begin planning 5 years in advance.

  • When It Comes to Retirement Distributions, 401(k)s Lack Valuable Flexibility Morningstar - Mon, Oct 17, 2016 6:00 PM NZDT
    When It Comes to Retirement Distributions, 401(k)s Lack Valuable Flexibility

    'Pro rata' rules mean that taking installment payments from a 401(k) could lead to suboptimal results.

  • Timeshares: Fabulous Opportunity or Financial Trap? Money Talks News - Sat, Oct 15, 2016 6:23 PM NZDT

    Before you get too carried away, watch the video below from Money Talks News finance expert Stacy Johnson. The resale market for timeshares is horrendous, with TUG estimating the average resale price being about 30-50 percent of the original cost.

  • Nearly half of young adults lack retirement savings, pension Associated Press - Sat, Oct 15, 2016 12:37 AM NZDT
    Nearly half of young adults lack retirement savings, pension

    Young Americans with even just $1 saved for retirement are ahead of the pack. Forty-eight percent of all Americans aged 18 to 30 have zero in retirement savings and no access to a traditional pension, ...

  • 10 Most Tax-Friendly States for Retirees 2016 Kiplinger - Fri, Oct 14, 2016 3:11 AM NZDT
    10 Most Tax-Friendly States for Retirees 2016

    iStock Retirees have special concerns when evaluating state tax policies. For instance, the mortgage might be paid off, but how bad are the property taxes - and how generous are the property tax breaks ...

  • Retirees, It's Okay to Spend Kiplinger - Thu, Oct 13, 2016 4:16 AM NZDT
    Retirees, It's Okay to Spend

    Most retirees of moderate means, as well as those who are affluent, don't even spend all of their income, much less draw down the principal in their nest egg.

  • 7 Tips to Live Well on Social Security Alone U.S.News & World Report - Thu, Oct 13, 2016 12:00 AM NZDT
    7 Tips to Live Well on Social Security Alone

    If Social Security is going to be your only or a major source of retirement income, it's particularly important to maximize your monthly payments. Here's how to make sure your Social Security payments will cover your retirement expenses. Housing is likely to be one of your largest expenses in retirement.

  • 10 Places to Retire on a Social Security Budget U.S.News & World Report - Thu, Oct 13, 2016 12:00 AM NZDT
    10 Places to Retire on a Social Security Budget

    The average monthly Social Security payment was $1,341 in January 2016. The analysis also factored in crime rates, access to health care and recreation opportunities. Consider these places where two Social Security checks are likely to pay for basic retirement costs.

  • 3 Ways to Get the Most Out of a Longer, Healthier Retirement Money - Wed, Oct 12, 2016 11:00 PM NZDT
    3 Ways to Get the Most Out of a Longer, Healthier Retirement

    Think about your money and your lifestyle.

  • The Biggest Surprises I Found in Retirement The Wall Street Journal - Mon, Oct 10, 2016 4:01 PM NZDT

    • Expenses: The importance of drafting a retirement budget is a theme that pops up regularly in these pages. If we include that figure in the bond portion of the retiree’s savings—and if the nest egg, as a result, is “bond heavy”—that would argue (as the questions above indicate) for reallocating this portfolio and adding more stocks.

  • Merrill Lynch to End Commission-Based Options for Retirement Savers The Wall Street Journal - Fri, Oct 7, 2016 12:43 PM NZDT
    Merrill Lynch to End Commission-Based Options for Retirement Savers

    Merrill Lynch will no longer give retirement savers the option of paying a commission for trades, a wholesale exit from the traditional Wall Street sales model in accounts that stand to be affected by new conflict-of-interest rules on retirement accounts. The Bank of America Corp. brokerage unit told its more than 14,000 brokers on Thursday that after April 10, when the new rules take effect, investors who want a retirement account at Merrill will need to pay a fee based on a percentage of their assets, instead of having the option of being charged for each transaction made in their account. The announced move, coming six months since the unveiling of the Obama administration’s fiduciary rule requiring brokers to put the interests of retirement savers ahead of their own, is roiling firms across the investing world as they look to comply and even capitalize on the changes.

  • New IRA rules close loopholes for account owners Bankrate.com - Thu, Oct 6, 2016 11:00 PM NZDT
    New IRA rules close loopholes for account owners

    IRA owners beware: Two recent rules on retirement accounts could throw your planning into disarray. One rule came out of tax court: IRA owners are limited to one 60-day rollover between IRAs in a 12-month period across all of their IRA accounts. The Supreme Court handed down the second rule.

  • Spooked About a Low-Return Environment? Don't Make These Mistakes Morningstar - Thu, Oct 6, 2016 6:00 PM NZDT

    Low return forecasts aren't a reason to skip investing, but they do have an impact on saving and withdrawal rates and asset allocation.

  • This is why most people don’t save money for retirement MarketWatch - Thu, Oct 6, 2016 4:30 AM NZDT

    Many adults say saving for retirement is like saving for a stranger

  • What Retirement Savings Rate Should Millennials Shoot For? Money - Wed, Oct 5, 2016 11:00 PM NZDT
    What Retirement Savings Rate Should Millennials Shoot For?

    Is it really 22% of pay?

  • This couple retired at 31 to travel around the world feed_manager_auto_publish_494--autopubtest_WPTUMBLR_485 - Wed, Oct 5, 2016 5:06 AM NZDT
    This couple retired at 31 to travel around the world

    It sounds impossible, but it’s a reality for Kristy Shen and Bryce Leung, a Canadian couple who retired at 31 and are traveling around the world. Shen and Leung, now 33, both worked as computer engineers making about $60,000-$70,000 annually. There were a lot of games,” Shen told Yahoo Finance.

  • It’s Never Been More Expensive to Use an ATM Money - Wed, Oct 5, 2016 3:00 AM NZDT
    It’s Never Been More Expensive to Use an ATM

    Fees hit record high for 10th consecutive year.

  • Why Your 2017 Medicare Premiums Could Jump 20% Money - Tue, Oct 4, 2016 11:00 PM NZDT
    Why Your 2017 Medicare Premiums Could Jump 20%

    People delaying Social Security, watch out.

  • 11 Tips for the Sandwich Generation: Paying for College and Retirement U.S.News & World Report - Tue, Oct 4, 2016 5:17 AM NZDT
    11 Tips for the Sandwich Generation: Paying for College and Retirement

    If you're part of the sandwich generation, you're taking care of your child and have an aging parent. If one or both need financial support, it can be pretty tough to save for your retirement. The dilemma is quite common, since nearly half (47 percent) of adults in their 40s and 50s have a parent age 65 or older living in their home and are either raising a young child or financially supporting a grown child (age 18 or older), according to the Pew Research Center.

  • 6 Big-League Mistakes of the Newly Retired U.S.News & World Report - Sat, Oct 1, 2016 5:54 AM NZDT
    6 Big-League Mistakes of the Newly Retired

    For about two years now, a class-action lawsuit has been ongoing in court, with minor league baseball players trying to get back pay based on federal and state minimum wage and overtime laws. Casto points out that a number of things might happen in your life.

  • A Retirement Crisis? There Are Actually Three, Says Vanguard Founder Jack Bogle Money - Fri, Sep 30, 2016 11:30 PM NZDT
    A Retirement Crisis? There Are Actually Three, Says Vanguard Founder Jack Bogle

    The man doesn't pull punches.

  • Are You Being Realistic About Your Retirement Prospects? Do This Reality Check Money - Thu, Sep 29, 2016 11:30 PM NZDT
    Are You Being Realistic About Your Retirement Prospects? Do This Reality Check

    Nearly 60% of those polled for TIAA’s recently released 2016 Lifetime Income Survey said they’re confident they’ll be able to turn their savings into income that can support them in retirement. Unfortunately, fewer than half of the people surveyed know how much they have in those accounts or have tried to assess how much retirement income their savings can actually generate. Here are three key questions you should ask yourself to ensure your planning reflects a realistic assessment of your retirement prospects.

  • WHY IT MATTERS: Social Security Associated Press - Wed, Sep 28, 2016 7:54 AM NZDT
    WHY IT MATTERS: Social Security

    WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: More than 60 million retirees, disabled workers, spouses and children rely on monthly Social Security benefits. That's nearly one in five Americans. The trustees who oversee Social Security say the program has enough money to pay full benefits until 2034. But at that point, Social Security will collect only enough taxes to pay 79 percent of benefits. Unless Congress acts, millions of people on fixed incomes would get an automatic 21 percent cut in benefits.

  • How to Save for Retirement on Less Than $40,000 Per Year U.S.News & World Report - Tue, Sep 27, 2016 3:30 AM NZDT

    Saving for retirement is especially difficult when you earn a small salary. Here's how to begin building wealth for retirement when you have a modest income. Find out how much you need to save to get the maximum possible 401(k) match, and then make every effort to deposit that amount in your retirement account.

  • 7 Retirement-Portfolio Withdrawal Mistakes to Avoid Morningstar - Wed, Sep 21, 2016 5:00 PM NZST

    Asset allocation, time horizons, and taxes can complicate withdrawal-rate planning.

  • Pros and Cons of Income-Generating Strategies in Retirement Morningstar - Wed, Sep 21, 2016 5:00 PM NZST

    Living off of current yields is just one way to extract the cash flow you need.

  • 7 Steps to Estimating Your In-Retirement Cash-Flow Needs Morningstar - Wed, Sep 21, 2016 5:00 PM NZST
    7 Steps to Estimating Your In-Retirement Cash-Flow Needs

    Note: This article is part of Morningstar’s September 2016 Retirement Matters Week special report. While retirees are often counseled to estimate that they’ll spend 75% to 80% of their working incomes in retirement, a paper by Morningstar’s head of retirement research, David Blanchett, demonstrated that there can be huge variations in income-replacement rates among retirees–with factors such as pre-retirement income and savings rates serving as key swing factors. Based on Blanchett’s findings, higher-income, higher-saving households may well need just 60% (or even less) of their pre-retirement income during retirement, while lower-earning, lower-saving households may need closer to 90%.

  • Don't Fall for These Common Social Security Myths Kiplinger - Wed, Sep 21, 2016 6:32 AM NZST
    Don't Fall for These Common Social Security Myths

    The complexity of the system, its evolution and a shift in demographics that threatens its solvency have created confusion over what Social Security can and will deliver . Social Security benefits are primarily based on two variables: your highest earnings over 35 years and your age when you file for benefits. The maximum benefit for someone retiring at full retirement age (66 for people born in 1943 through 1954) in 2016 is $2,639 a month.

  • 19 Moves That Will Help You Retire Early and in Style Money Talks News - Mon, Sep 19, 2016 9:14 PM NZST

    For many people, retirement — never mind early retirement — seems out of reach. Social Security alone isn’t enough to have you living the good life during your golden years, and as we’ll discuss later, you’ll want to put off taking that money as long as you can. Once your rainy-day fund is full, put that 10 percent you’re not spending into a dedicated retirement fund.

  • The Bucket Approach to Retirement Allocation Morningstar - Mon, Sep 19, 2016 5:00 PM NZST
    The Bucket Approach to Retirement Allocation

    The average interest rate on a six-month certificate of deposit was 9.1% in 1970 and 13.4% in 1980. But two decades worth of declining interest rates have dragged yields way down, dramatically compounding the challenge for retirees. The bucket approach to retirement-portfolio management, pioneered by financial-planning guru Harold Evensky, aims to meet those challenges, effectively helping retirees create a paycheck from their investment assets.

  • Are You Social Security Savvy? U.S.News & World Report - Sat, Sep 17, 2016 6:45 AM NZST
    Are You Social Security Savvy?

    There is no denying Social Security is complex. Find out if you are Social Security savvy by seeing if you can answer these questions correctly. Seniors applying at 62 get money sooner, but receive 25 percent smaller payments than they would receive at full retirement age.

  • Ask Stacy: Can I Make Money Flipping Houses? Money Talks News - Sat, Sep 17, 2016 5:41 AM NZST

    While Robert doesn’t say where his interest in flipping houses comes from, I hope it’s not from one of the many reality shows on the subject. Can you make money flipping houses? You can make big money in real estate.

  • 5 Medicare Tips for New Retirees Money - Fri, Sep 16, 2016 10:00 PM NZST
    5 Medicare Tips for New Retirees

    Switching from employer health coverage can be tricky.

  • The Right—and Wrong—Investing Risks in Retirement Money - Thu, Sep 15, 2016 10:00 PM NZST
    The Right—and Wrong—Investing Risks in Retirement

    Retirees can hobble their portfolios by reaching for extra income. Here's a better strategy.

  • How to Save For Retirement While Paying for a Child's College U.S.News & World Report - Thu, Sep 15, 2016 1:41 AM NZST

    The typical investor has two long-term goals: retirement and kids' college expenses. "Retirement savings needs to outweigh college savings," says David Hryck, a tax attorney and personal finance expert with the Reed Smith law firm in New York. "The biggest issue is the fact that you can borrow for college, whereas you can't borrow for retirement," says Oscar Vives Ortiz, a planner with First Home Investment Services in Tampa Bay/St. Petersburg.

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