DOW - Dow Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
48.49
-1.76 (-3.50%)
At close: 4:02PM EST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close50.25
Open49.88
Bid48.26 x 1100
Ask48.78 x 800
Day's range48.04 - 50.27
52-week range40.44 - 60.52
Volume5,755,995
Avg. volume3,805,467
Market cap35.955B
Beta (5Y monthly)N/A
PE ratio (TTM)19.54
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings date28 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est56.29
  • Dow (DOW) Gears Up for Q4 Earnings: Is a Beat in the Cards?
    Zacks

    Dow (DOW) Gears Up for Q4 Earnings: Is a Beat in the Cards?

    Our proven model predicts an earnings beat for Dow (DOW) this time around.

  • Business Wire

    Dow named 2020 Best Place to Work for LGBTQ+ Equality by Human Rights Campaign Foundation

    In recognition of its inclusive workplace, Dow (NYSE: DOW) has been named by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation to its 2020 list of the "Best Places to Work" for LGBTQ+ equality. This marks the Company’s 15th consecutive year receiving a perfect score on HRC’s Corporate Equality Index, a national benchmarking tool on corporate policies and practices pertinent to LGBTQ+ employees.

  • Trump just scored two big wins on trade — but here's why stocks may still tank
    Yahoo Finance

    Trump just scored two big wins on trade — but here's why stocks may still tank

    Stocks are overbought and could be headed for a pullback.

  • Dow (DOW) Inks PCR Supply Deal With Avangard Innovative
    Zacks

    Dow (DOW) Inks PCR Supply Deal With Avangard Innovative

    Dow (DOW) expects the partnership with Avangard Innovative to offer consistent processing, and reliable supply of PCR-based LLDPE and LDPE to its customers across North America.

  • Should You Buy Dow Inc. (NYSE:DOW) For Its Dividend?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Buy Dow Inc. (NYSE:DOW) For Its Dividend?

    Dividend paying stocks like Dow Inc. (NYSE:DOW) tend to be popular with investors, and for good reason - some research...

  • DuPont’s Breakups Only Lead to More Breakups
    Bloomberg

    DuPont’s Breakups Only Lead to More Breakups

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Round and round the DuPont merry-go-round of financial engineering we go.The chemicals giant agreed on Sunday to sell its nutrition and biosciences division to International Flavors & Fragrances Inc. via a tax-friendly Reverse Morris Trust transaction that values the business at about $26 billion. DuPont de Nemours Inc. will receive a one-time $7.3 billion cash payment and its shareholders will own 55.4% of the combined entity.This is just the latest in a long line of dealmaking by DuPont chairman Ed Breen, who earned the respect of the investing world for salvaging Tyco International from scandal in part by breaking it up several times.(1) At DuPont, he’s helped orchestrate a complicated merger with rival Dow Chemical and a subsequent three-way split. After some rejiggering of the combined companies’ various assets amid pushback from activist investors, DuPont this year spun off the Dow Inc. commodity-chemical business and the Corteva Inc. agricultural-products company. Breen may not be done tinkering with DuPont’s portfolio after the International Flavors deal; Bloomberg News has reported that DuPont is also evaluating a divestiture of its transportation and industrial-chemicals unit.  The results of all this maneuvering have been just so-so. Dow is up about 9% since the March record date for its separation, lagging the S&P 500 Index and the benchmark’s materials sub-group. Corteva has slumped nearly 6% since its May debut. DuPont itself is down more than 14% so far this year. That’s partly a reflection of the sheer amount of time it took to orchestrate this complicated musical chairs.The merger with Dow was announced four years ago, and the interim waiting period can create a sort of spin purgatory as investors hold off on rewarding a soon-to-be-simpler company with a valuation lift until all the paperwork is signed. And when a process takes that long, you’re bound to become a victim of bad timing. Dow and Corteva were spun off into a terrible market for chemicals as the U.S.-China trade war and a slowing economic backdrop weighed on demand and profit margins. Moody’s Investors Service this month issued its 2020 outlook for the North American and EMEA chemical sector, calling for an average Ebitda decline of about 5% amid soft commodity prices and weak investment trends. DuPont shares, meanwhile, also have been dragged down by its legal fight with a prior spinoff, Chemours Co., over liabilities linked to PFAS, the so-called forever chemical that was used in the manufacturing of Teflon.Breakup enthusiasts would tell you the share slump might have been worse if these businesses were still bundled together and one management team was trying to oversee their competing capital requirements and growth profiles. There’s certainly a logic to this latest deal. Nutrition and biosciences is DuPont’s largest division and has one of the more attractive growth profiles, but DuPont clearly wasn’t getting credit for this business in its stock.The deal with IFF values the DuPont unit at more than 18 times its adjusted Ebitda in the past year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That’s well above what the parent company commands. At the same time, there’s a reason the nutrition and biosciences unit commands a higher valuation. The removal of this generally stable business may make it harder for DuPont to prove that its earnings and sales growth can rise above economic volatility.If DuPont follows through on carving out the transportation and industrial unit as well, that would help limit its exposure to the swings in the automotive industry, which has been a particularly tough market of late. But it’s unclear what the endgame is here. There’s something deeply unsatisfying about a company using yet more breakups to fix a valuation disconnect that its first round of breakups was meant to rectify. Eventually, you run out of assets to sell or spin off. (1) Tyco eventually merged with Johnson Controls years after Breen had moved on, and the combined company took the latter’s name.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • ‘Post-Chemical World’ Takes Shape as Agribusiness Goes Green
    Bloomberg

    ‘Post-Chemical World’ Takes Shape as Agribusiness Goes Green

    (Bloomberg) -- Agribusiness is increasingly turning to natural and sustainable alternatives to chemicals as consumers rebuff genetically modified foods and concerns grow over Big Ag’s role in climate change.At the heart of the trend are innovations that harness beneficial microorganisms in the soil, including seed-coatings of naturally occurring bacteria and fungi that can do the same work as traditional chemicals, from warding off pests to helping plants flourish, according to a global patent study by research firm GreyB Services.“Both entrepreneurs and investors are saying, ‘Hey, the writing is on the wall, we’re entering a post-chemical world,’” said Rob LeClerc, chief executive officer of AgFunder, an online venture-capital platform. “The seed companies who have billions in market cap are like ‘We need to do something,’ and everyone recognizes the opportunity.”Much of the handwringing over farm chemicals stems from the recent fate of glyphosate, the most ubiquitous weedkiller ever. Regulators around the world are tightening up rules around using the chemical, including Europe and Mexico. Meanwhile, thousands of lawsuits that could result in billions of dollars in penalties are pending against Bayer AG over whether its glyphosate-containing product, Roundup, caused cancer. Bayer insists it’s safe, and some government agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency say it isn’t likely to cause cancer in humans.The global fertilizer and pesticide market is around $240 billion, and grows 2% to 3% a year, according to Ben Belldegrun, a managing partner at Pontifax AgTech, a company that invests in food and agriculture technology. While so-called biologicals including biofertilizers, biopesticides and biostimulants are just 2% of that market, those have been growing closer to 15% a year for the past five years, Belldegrun said.Pressure for less chemical-intensive farming methods is coming from retailers like Walmart Inc., non-governmental organizations and consumers, who are throwing more dollars toward organic and other niche foods with environmental or animal welfare claims.As population increases worldwide, the demand for agricultural products is projected to grow 15% over the next decade with no change in the amount of land available for farming, according to a joint report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization.“There’s a growing world population and how are we going to feed all of these people?” asked Craig Forney, assistant director for licensing and business development at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. “At the same time, we want to protect the environment. We need to use land better and use the resources better.”The answer, Forney said, is “intensified agricultural production to increase productivity of land and do it with minimal chemical support.”Patents give owners the exclusive right to an invention, and can indicate both where research funding is being spent and where companies or universities expect to generate revenue in the future.Companies like BASF SE, Bayer and Syngenta AG have patents on products using naturally-occurring microbes to help crops flourish even when there is low water availability, according to GreyB’s analysis. The microbes can act as catalysts to encourage growth. Biological-based fungicides and insecticides can also help reduce crop damage from insects, slugs and fungi.“Seed-applied biological products can extend the window of disease and pest protection, while some also provide alternate modes of action that can reduce the build-up of resistance, aid with nutrient management and reduce plant stress,” said Chris Judd, BASF’s global strategic marketing manager for Seed Treatment, Inoculants and Biologicals.Evonik Industries AG, Altair Nanotechnologies Inc., Covestro AG and startup Indigo AG have been active in obtaining patents and publishing research in the area of using microbes, as have universities like China’s Zhejiang University and Nanjing Agricultural University, according to GreyB.Likewise, thousands of patents are being issued to companies like BASF, Bayer and Dow Inc. for more natural ways of managing pests including pheromones that deter breeding and reflective mulches, instead of chemical-based insecticides.Germany’s Bayer, which bought agriculture chemical giant Monsanto Co. in 2018, sees “high growth potential” for biologicals, citing a challenging regulatory environment for chemicals and a growing emphasis on sustainability in agriculture. Bayer has a research and development team solely focused on them. The company also is hunting for partnerships to boost its portfolio. Benoit Hartmann, head of biologics at Bayer, said the increased investments show how the science around microbes has matured in recent years.In 2013, BASF acquired seed-treatment supplier Becker Underwood, which helped the company become a leader in biological agents to fight bacteria and fungi. Judd said the company sees demand for biologicals increasing but maintains that they need “to be compatible with an increasing array of chemistries and to have the ability to survive on the seed for adequate periods.”The increased patenting reflects a trend of researchers looking for ways to help promote organic and non-GMO farming, said Nicole Kling, a patent agent with Nixon Peabody who specializes in the biotechnology field.With biologicals, “You’re not introducing chemicals with the scare quotes around it,” Kling said. “You’re not doing anything that would harm the agricultural workers.”Researchers and companies are looking for new solutions for farming with less chemicals because organic farming, the most popular alternative to modern conventional farming, often results in lower yields. Still, demand for food continues increasing. Iowa State and other universities around the world, using government funding or in partnership with companies, are rushing to deal with those competing demands.“The hope is someday in the future they will merge and you will have organic and non-GMO products that are just as productive as Big Ag,” Forney said.That’s where things like precision agriculture to tailor the application of nutrients, artificial intelligence to monitor soil conditions and the development of new plant hybrids come in.Other emerging techniques that could boost yields while helping farmers use less chemicals is artificial intelligence, which is being used to analyze which seeds and crops can yield the most based on changing soil conditions and weather patterns on a farm. The promise of quantum computers would let companies use massive computing power to develop and analyze new seeds and fertilizers.Scientists also are developing new plant varieties, with applications for new varieties up 9% in 2018, according to the World Intellectual Property Organization. China led the growth, with more than a quarter of the applications for new varieties.Much of the research in crop biotech is centered in the U.S., China, Germany, Japan and South Korea, though it’s being adapted to meet local conditions in Africa, Latin America and Asia, according to WIPO, an agency of the U.N.Demand for more food will be greatest in Africa, India and the Middle East. In the developing world, there is little food scarcity because “we did good things with all that ‘better living through chemistry,’” Kling said, referring to a play on an old DuPont motto. It has come at a cost, though.“We’re starting to see some of the effects of that -- all of this wonderful industrialization has contributed to climate change,” Kling said. “We’re starting to see people swing back in the other direction.”(Adds executive comment in fifteenth paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Lydia Mulvany in Chicago at lmulvany2@bloomberg.net;Susan Decker in Washington at sdecker1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, ;James Attwood at jattwood3@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth WassermanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Dow's (DOW) Stock Rises 10% in 3 Months: What's Driving It?
    Zacks

    Dow's (DOW) Stock Rises 10% in 3 Months: What's Driving It?

    Dow (DOW) is gaining from cost synergy savings and investment in growth projects.

  • Dow (DOW) Poised on Cost Reductions, Project Investments
    Zacks

    Dow (DOW) Poised on Cost Reductions, Project Investments

    Dow (DOW) should benefit from its investments in high-return growth projects and cost synergy savings.

  • The biggest deals and attempted deals of the 2010s 
    Yahoo Finance

    The biggest deals and attempted deals of the 2010s 

    As 2019 ends with major deals, Yahoo Finance looks back at the decade on the mergers and acquisitions in Corprorate America.

  • Chemical Stock Earnings Due on Nov 7: APD, ESI, TROX & ICL
    Zacks

    Chemical Stock Earnings Due on Nov 7: APD, ESI, TROX & ICL

    Let's take a look at how these chemical companies are poised ahead of their earnings release.

  • Dow's (DOW) Earnings and Revenues Surpass Estimates in Q3
    Zacks

    Dow's (DOW) Earnings and Revenues Surpass Estimates in Q3

    Dow (DOW) benefits from actions to reduce costs in Q3. It has completed roughly $1.37 billion cost synergy program in the quarter.

  • Dow's (DOW) Earnings & Revenues Beat Estimates in Q3
    Zacks

    Dow's (DOW) Earnings & Revenues Beat Estimates in Q3

    Dow's (DOW) adjusted earnings of 91 per share for Q3 surpassed the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 72 cents.

  • Amazon, Twitter, Intel earnings — What to know in markets Thursday
    Yahoo Finance

    Amazon, Twitter, Intel earnings — What to know in markets Thursday

    Tech takes the spotlight Thursday when three big names gear up to report quarterly results: Amazon, Twitter and Intel.

  • Chemical Stock Earnings Due on Oct 24: DOW, EMN, AXTA & GRA
    Zacks

    Chemical Stock Earnings Due on Oct 24: DOW, EMN, AXTA & GRA

    Let's take a look at how these chemical companies are poised ahead of their earnings release.

  • Is There An Opportunity With Dow Inc.'s (NYSE:DOW) 50% Undervaluation?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is There An Opportunity With Dow Inc.'s (NYSE:DOW) 50% Undervaluation?

    How far off is Dow Inc. (NYSE:DOW) from its intrinsic value? Using the most recent financial data, we'll take a look...

  • Dow (DOW) Warms Up to Q3 Earnings: What's in the Offing?
    Zacks

    Dow (DOW) Warms Up to Q3 Earnings: What's in the Offing?

    Our proven model does not conclusively predict that Dow (DOW) is likely to beat the Zacks Consensus Estimate this quarter.

  • Dow Enables Recyclability through OPULUX HGT Optical Finishes
    Zacks

    Dow Enables Recyclability through OPULUX HGT Optical Finishes

    Dow (DOW) unveils new optical finishing for PE-based packaging.

  • Dow (DOW) Announces Launch of AGILITY CE Plastic Resin
    Zacks

    Dow (DOW) Announces Launch of AGILITY CE Plastic Resin

    Dow (DOW) introduces its consistent and high-quality resin made up of 70% recycled plastic.

  • Read This Before Judging Dow Inc.'s (NYSE:DOW) ROE
    Simply Wall St.

    Read This Before Judging Dow Inc.'s (NYSE:DOW) ROE

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  • A Foolish Take: What's Behind the Dow's 2019 Rise?
    Motley Fool

    A Foolish Take: What's Behind the Dow's 2019 Rise?

    There are big winners, but also some sizable losers.

  • Dow Inc. (DOW) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Dow Inc. (DOW) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Dow Inc. (DOW) closed at $42.63 in the latest trading session, marking a +0.61% move from the prior day.

  • Dow (DOW) and Fuenix Ecogy to Produce 100% Circular Plastic
    Zacks

    Dow (DOW) and Fuenix Ecogy to Produce 100% Circular Plastic

    The deal highlights Dow's (DOW) strategy to shift toward a circular economy for plastics.

  • Interested In Dow Inc. (NYSE:DOW)’s Upcoming 1.7% Dividend? You Have 4 Days Left
    Simply Wall St.

    Interested In Dow Inc. (NYSE:DOW)’s Upcoming 1.7% Dividend? You Have 4 Days Left

    Dow Inc. (NYSE:DOW) stock is about to trade ex-dividend in 4 days time. This means that investors who purchase shares...