• ConocoPhillips (COP) Up 0.2% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?
    Zacks

    ConocoPhillips (COP) Up 0.2% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?

    ConocoPhillips (COP) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Occidental Cuts Dividend to a Penny With Debt Woes Mounting
    Bloomberg

    Occidental Cuts Dividend to a Penny With Debt Woes Mounting

    (Bloomberg) -- Occidental Petroleum Corp. cut its quarterly dividend by 91% to the lowest since at least the 1970s amid the pandemic-driven collapse in energy demand that has strained the oil explorer’s ability to shoulder its debt.Occidental shareholders will receive a penny per share on July 15, the Houston-based company said in a statement Friday. The move extends a cut announced in March when it trimmed the payout to 11 cents from 79 cents.The surprise cut came the same day under-fire Chief Executive Vicki Hollub and the rest of the board of directors won re-election at Occidental’s annual shareholders’ meeting. The company will announce the final vote tallies in a regulatory filing later.Hollub has weathered extreme pressure from shareholders ever since outbidding Chevron Corp. to win the purchase of Anadarko Petroleum Corp. last year. The deal saddled Occidental with some $40 billion of debt that was looking hard to pay off even before Covid-19 wiped out global oil demand, sending crude prices plunging to an unprecedented minus $40 a barrel at one point last month.The benchmark U.S. oil price rebounded 88% in May to close the month above $35 a barrel, but it’s still 44% down from its high point in January and below a level that would ensure healthy cash flow for most producers.The dividend reduction will save Occidental about $360 million a year, but it’s a drop in the ocean compared to the wall of debt due over the coming years. The company probably kept a token payout to avoid mandatory selling of the stock by dividend funds and to signal that it aims to restock the stipend at some point in the future, according to Leo Mariani, an analyst at KeyBanc Capital Markets.“They need that extra money at $35 a barrel oil, so it’s the right move,” Mariani said by phone. “They’ve got to do whatever they can to survive.”What Bloomberg Intelligence SaysAlready reeling from elevated debt, a weak fundamental backdrop and investors disgruntled by the Anadarko deal, Occidental doesn’t have many near-term positives we can speak to.\-- Vincent G. Piazza and Evan Lee, analystsRead the full report here.The company’s primary focus is on “maximizing liquidity and reducing debt,” Hollub said at the annual meeting, held virtually on Friday. The company has gone from being a steady, diversified oil producer to a debt-laden, shale-focused driller that now has a market value of just $11.7 billion, less than a third of the price it paid for Anadarko. Its credit rating was downgraded to junk in March.The stock dropped 5.1% to $12.95 in New York on a day when West Texas Intermediate oil futures jumped more than 5%.Hollub fended off a shareholder revolt by making peace with the company’s second-largest shareholder, billionaire Carl Icahn, ending a nine-month public battle that included personal barbs against the CEO. However, it came at a cost. Hollub and her fellow directors agreed to cede some control by putting nominees of the activist investor on the board.(Updates with analyst’s comment from sixth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Oil Prices Slide As U.S.-China Tensions Return
    Oilprice.com

    Oil Prices Slide As U.S.-China Tensions Return

    The recent oil price rally appears to have stalled as tensions between the U.S. and China weigh on energy markets and the rebound in global demand appears to slow

  • Climate Crusaders vs. Big Oil: Who Will Win the Legal Row?
    Zacks

    Climate Crusaders vs. Big Oil: Who Will Win the Legal Row?

    Climate suits against Big Oil and other fossil fuel companies cruise to state court proceedings following Ninth Circuit's ruling.

  • Will Exxon and Chevron Cut Their Dividends?
    Motley Fool

    Will Exxon and Chevron Cut Their Dividends?

    Through good times and bad, the two oil giants have supported their dividends. Can they do it again this time around?

  • 4 Oil Stocks to Avoid in June
    Motley Fool

    4 Oil Stocks to Avoid in June

    The price of oil seems to be trending upward; maybe this is a buying opportunity. Four stocks in particular to avoid in June are Halliburton (NYSE: HAL), United States Oil Fund (NYSEMKT: USO), Occidental Petroleum (NYSE: OXY), and Patterson-UTI Energy (NASDAQ: PTEN). Here's why these Motley Fool contributors say you shouldn't be tricked into picking up shares of these likely underperformers.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of CNP earnings conference call or presentation 7-May-20 3:00pm GMT

    Q1 2020 CenterPoint Energy Inc Earnings Call

  • Reuters

    U.S. pipeline operator Energy Transfer warns of coming job cuts

    U.S. pipeline operator Energy Transfer LP will begin cutting about 6% of its workforce next week, underscoring the spreading impact of weak oil and gas prices on the energy business. Marshall McCrea, chief commercial officer for the Dallas-based company, said in a recorded message to employees the cuts would begin Monday and affect about 6% of the company's staff, according to two people familiar with the recording. U.S. oil and gas producers have curtailed or shut in wells in response to crude prices down 45% since the start of the year, reducing deliveries to pipeline operators.

  • 4 Top Stock Trades for Monday: ZS, CGC, OXY, UBER
    InvestorPlace

    4 Top Stock Trades for Monday: ZS, CGC, OXY, UBER

    After a bumpy couple of days, the S&P 500 traded somewhat quietly on Friday, after bouncing off the 3,000 area and 200-day moving average. With that in mind, let's look at a few top stock trades for next week. Top Stock Trades for Monday No. 1: Zscaler (ZS) Click to EnlargeSource: Chart courtesy of StockCharts.com Zscaler (NASDAQ:ZS) shares are ripping higher after better-than-expected earnings.Coming into the event, shares were trading higher, grinding up in a modest channel (blue lines) and maintaining about the 20-day moving average. However, shares were struggling to clear the $77.50 level.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsThat is, until earnings. The stock opened up near prior 2019 resistance around $85, before surging up to $98 as shares ended the day Friday up 29%. From here, I wouldn't be surprised to see $100 hit, with the 123.6% extension up near $101.On the downside, however, I want to see prior resistance hold as support at $85 -- along with the prior high near $90. Top Stock Trades for Monday No. 2: Canopy Growth (CGC) Click to EnlargeSource: Chart courtesy of StockCharts.com Canopy Growth (NYSE:CGC) stock is getting crushed on Friday, down just about 20% after disappointing quarterly results.The move comes after last week's breakout and this week's continuation above the 200-day moving average and $20 mark. So, what now?As you can see on the chart above, CGC stock tried to rally back over the $18.25-ish area, which was the April high and a significant level dating back to October 2019. However, shares were rejected on this move.Bulls need to see this level reclaimed. If it can, it puts a gap-fill back up toward $20 in play, as well as the 200-day moving average. On the downside, I want to see the 50-day moving average and the backside of prior downtrend resistance (blue line) hold as support. Below puts $14 on the table. Top Stock Trades for Monday No. 3: Occidental Petroleum (OXY) Click to EnlargeSource: Chart courtesy of StockCharts.com Occidental Petroleum (NYSE:OXY) isn't looking too hot, down 5% on Friday. Shares were unable to push higher, most recently failing at $15 before rolling over.However, the lack of bullishness has been a multi-month process. Shares failed to reclaim the 23.6% retracement, before forming a series of lower highs. Now, it's losing the 50-day moving average, as well as uptrend support.From here, bulls need to see the $12.75 area hold as support. Below $12.50 and a retest of $10 isn't out of the question.Given how poorly the stock has done amid the big rebound in the S&P 500 and crude oil, traders may be better off looking elsewhere than OXY. I mean sheesh, crude just had its best month ever and Occidental is down about 20% for May.Shares do not look attractive amid the current setup. Top Stock Trades for Monday No. 4: Uber (UBER) Click to EnlargeSource: Chart courtesy of StockCharts.com Shares of Uber (NYSE:UBER) have made an impressive climb from the March lows. The stock hit $14 in March and continues knocking on the 78.6% retracement just below $36.The firm is in talks with GrubHub (NYSE:GRUB) to hammer out an all-stock deal. If the stock reacts bearishly to the news, we have to consider a pullback. In this case, look to the $31 area, where Uber will find its 200-day moving average and uptrend support (blue line).On a breakout over the 78.6% retracement, look for a possible gap-fill up toward $40.Bret Kenwell is the manager and author of Future Blue Chips and is on Twitter @BretKenwell. As of this writing, he did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * Top Stock Picker Reveals His Next 1,000% Winner * The Huge Story for 2020 & Beyond That You Aren't Hearing About * Revolutionary Tech Behind 5G Rollout Is Being Pioneered By This 1 Company * The 1 Stock All Retirees Must Own The post 4 Top Stock Trades for Monday: ZS, CGC, OXY, UBER appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • MarketWatch

    Occidental Petroleum cuts dividend to a penny a share

    Occidental Petroleum Corp. said Friday that its board of directors has declared a regular quarterly dividend of a penny a share, payable on July 15 to shareholders of record as of June 15. Friday's news was an update to the energy company's previously announced dividend policy change from March 10, in which Occidental reduced its quarterly dividend to 11 cents a share. Shares of Occidental have lost nearly 70% this year, compared with losses around 6.5% and 12% for the S&P 500 index and the Dow Jones Industrial Average in the same period.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Occidental Announces Dividend

    HOUSTON, May 29, 2020 -- Occidental Petroleum Corporation (NYSE:OXY) said today that its Board of Directors has declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0.01 per share on.

  • Top Energy Stocks for June 2020
    Investopedia

    Top Energy Stocks for June 2020

    The energy sector is comprised of companies focused on the exploration, production, and marketing of oil, gas, and renewable resources around the world. Popular energy sector stocks include upstream companies that are primarily engaged in the exploration of oil or gas reserves. Well-known companies in the sector are Hess Corp. (HES) and Diamondback Energy Inc. (FANG).

  • MarketWatch

    Raytheon Technologies Corp., Boeing share losses contribute to Dow's 265-point fall

    DOW UPDATE Shares of Raytheon Technologies Corp. and Boeing are trading lower Friday afternoon, propelling the Dow Jones Industrial Average selloff. Shares of Raytheon Technologies Corp. (RTX) and Boeing (BA) are contributing to the index's intraday decline, as the Dow (DJIA) was most recently trading 265 points (1.

  • MarketWatch

    Dow's nearly 200-point drop led by losses in Boeing, Raytheon Technologies Corp. stocks

    DOW UPDATE The Dow Jones Industrial Average is declining Friday morning with shares of Boeing and Raytheon Technologies Corp. seeing the biggest drops for the price-weighted average. Shares of Boeing (BA) and Raytheon Technologies Corp.

  • Protecting the Dividend at Any Cost Is a Real Risk to Exxon Mobil Stock
    InvestorPlace

    Protecting the Dividend at Any Cost Is a Real Risk to Exxon Mobil Stock

    Exxon Mobil (NYSE:XOM), the world's largest energy producer, hasn't had a great year. Exxon Mobil stock has shed 36.1% of its value since December, and it certainly isn't alone.Source: Shutterstock The novel coronavirus pandemic has wreaked havoc across all markets, but perhaps the most severely affected sector is the oil industry. Plummeting oil prices and oversupply has resulted in a 37% reduction in the Dow Jones Oil & Gas index since December.Exxon continues to pique the interest investors due to the consistent growth in its dividends and its long-term appeal. Unfortunately for Exxon's investors, their dividend and long term perspectives about the XOM stock are likely to take a hit this year.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsThe company has already announced that it will be freezing its dividend for the first time in 13 years amidst the market uncertainty. Also, its significant debt load will significantly impact its long term outlook. Recent Performance of Exxon Mobil StockFor the first time in 32 years, Exxon reported a loss of $610 million, or $0.14 per share. Revenues were down 11.7% to the year-ago period and 16.4% for the past quarter. * 7 Red-Hot Vaccine Stocks Racing to Develop a Coronavirus Cure Production volumes rose during the quarter due to its Permian Basin and Guyana Oil resources. However, the increase in the production volumes was partly offset by the lower oil prices and refining margins. Additionally, its depreciation and depletion expenses rose by 28% since the previous quarter.These effects can be partly attributed to the crippling effects of the pandemic, but for the past five years, the company has been on a downward spiral as far as earnings are concerned.Its EPS and revenues peaked in 2011, and in 2012 when we witnessed the highest oil prices of the decade. For the next five years, revenues reduced by a considerable margin after recovering in 2018. However, since then the downward trend continues and it seems that it will carry-on for the foreseeable future.It seems as though, in maintaining its track record of increasing dividends, the company has compromised on its profitability and free cash flows. Therefore, there are several question marks about its growth, profitability, and sustainability of its dividend model. The Dividend Problem Click to EnlargeSource: Muslim Farooque Exxon Mobil has a dividend history that is second to none, which has consistently grown in the past 37 years. However, the company recently announced that it was freezing its dividend for the first time in 13 years.Royal Dutch Shell already announced that it would slash its dividend by 66%, which has investors concerned about the future.Dividend yields in the oil industry have dipped but are still impressive in comparison to other sectors.XOM stock is currently ranked third in terms of its dividend yields in the industry. However, the main question that potential investors need to consider is how much of their dividend is being paid from cheap debt.Financial leverage for Exxon increased by 3% in its latest quarter, after raising an additional $8.5 billion on March 17. It has raised another $9.5 billion on April 13, which represents a total increase of 38% in its debt load since December last year.The majority of this debt is being used to cover its massive dividend payments. This a recipe for disaster considering how every company is looking to preserve its liquidity at this time. Long Term TroublesExxon Mobil is a riskier company than it was a few years ago and been a consistent underperformer. The oil industry is in a rut, and a market pull-back is uncertain at this point. Therefore, there is a lot to contemplate about Exxon's management in these testing times.Perhaps the best place to start is for the company to preserve its financial flexibility. In doing so, CEO Darren Woods announced a 30% reduction in its capital spending and a 15% reduction in operational expenses.Also, Exxon and Chevron Corp. (NYSE:CVX) have announced a collective shut-in of 800,000 barrels per day due to the depressed demand and plunging crude oil prices.However, the company remains adamant about protecting its dividend, but in doing so, it would have to consider massive reductions in capital expenditures and to take up additional debt. This is a risky strategy that might significantly hamper its operational capabilities in the future. Bottom Line on Exxon Mobil StockExxon Mobil finds itself in a precarious position, heading into the second quarter. Analysts expect the loss per share to further drop to $0.62 in the upcoming quarter.It seems that the company is still resolute about its dividend payouts, which continues to add to its debt load. Additionally, it's sacrificing its capital spending, which is a crucial element for success in the industry. Therefore, I'm bearish on XOM stock, considering its riskiness at this point.As of this writing, Muslim Farooque did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * Top Stock Picker Reveals His Next 1,000% Winner * The Huge Story for 2020 & Beyond That You Aren't Hearing About * Revolutionary Tech Behind 5G Rollout Is Being Pioneered By This 1 Company * The 1 Stock All Retirees Must Own The post Protecting the Dividend at Any Cost Is a Real Risk to Exxon Mobil Stock appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • United Natural Foods, Ralph Lauren, ExxonMobil and Chevron highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    United Natural Foods, Ralph Lauren, ExxonMobil and Chevron highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    United Natural Foods, Ralph Lauren, ExxonMobil and Chevron highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • ConocoPhillips Closes Australian Asset Divestment to Santos
    Zacks

    ConocoPhillips Closes Australian Asset Divestment to Santos

    ConocoPhillips (COP) intends to use the proceeds from the Australian asset divestment for general corporate purposes.

  • Greif (GEF) to Report Q2 Earnings: What's in the Offing?
    Zacks

    Greif (GEF) to Report Q2 Earnings: What's in the Offing?

    While Greif's (GEF) Q2 results are likely to reflect benefits from cost-cutting efforts and the Caraustar buyout, bleak economic conditions due to the coronavirus crisis might have played spoilsport.

  • Trump's China Fight Shows Covid-19 Hasn't Changed Oil's World
    Bloomberg

    Trump's China Fight Shows Covid-19 Hasn't Changed Oil's World

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The big question haunting oil is how much Covid-19 has changed the world. Will more people give up on commuting or, conversely, drive into work? Has air travel peaked for good? Have Londoners and Angelenos  been spoiled by a few haze-free months?Judging from the past week, though, maybe oil’s real problem is the world hasn’t changed enough.Last year, the big challenge confronting oil demand was the trade war. This eased somewhat in January with the “phase one” agreement committing China to buy more U.S. exports, including extra freedom molecules of energy. Even then, however, most of President Donald Trump’s tariffs were left in place, and sensitive issues such as Chinese subsidies were deferred. It was more ceasefire than treaty.The guns are silent no longer. China’s decision to effectively lop off the second half of Hong Kong’s “one country, two systems” rubric was met with Secretary of State Michael Pompeo’s announcement the U.S. would take Beijing at its word. No longer recognized as autonomous, Hong Kong’s trade could be hit with tariffs, and the U.S. could even impose sanctions.More importantly, this is a tangible breach after months of escalating tension, with tit-for-tat expulsions of journalists and Trump even floating the idea of China being “knowingly responsible” in the spread of Covid-19. The phase one agreement, meanwhile, was off to a slow start, with China taking just $14.4 billion of goods listed under the deal in the first quarter, versus the $34 billion implied by the targets, according to Bloomberg Economics.With November looming, and his presidency tainted by America’s Covid-19 death toll and joblessness, Trump may well have decided China makes a better pandemic scapegoat than economic buttress. But antipathy to Beijing extends beyond the president. In the same week Pompeo opened the door to sanctions over Hong Kong, the Democratic-controlled House voted almost unanimously to  authorize sanctions against China for human-rights abuses against the country’s Uighur minority. For reasons extending back much further than the existence of the Chinese Communist Party, such prods into the country’s internal affairs will touch a nerve, potentially escalating a trade dispute into broader great-power rivalry.The unraveling of free trade has been apparent since at least the 2016 presidential campaign. As I wrote here a few years ago, this is particularly pernicious for an oil market built on the back of globalization and U.S. security guarantees.Far from provoking mass kumbaya in the face of a common enemy, Covid-19 elicited a more Darwinian response, even between supposedly united states. Besides attempts to tattoo a flag on the virus, its arrival threw a spotlight on countries’ vulnerability to shortages of imported medical supplies, providing fodder for economic nationalists seeking re-shoring and a general shortening of supply chains. Fragmentation means friction, which tends to suppress growth over time. In projections published last year, BP Plc ran a “less globalization” case that took a hefty chunk out of forecast oil and natural gas demand; in the latter case, even more than for a scenario of quicker de-carbonization.The world also hasn’t changed as much as it might seem when it comes to oil supply, either. The coronavirus world tour coincided with the breakdown of Saudi-Russia cooperation on production cuts — and then facilitated a rapid rapprochement as oil prices headed toward negative territory. The swinging supply cuts forced on OPEC+ members, along with signs of congestion resuming in Chinese cities especially, helped drag oil back into the $30s this month.But the underlying dynamics haven’t changed altogether. Russia has implemented big cuts but is reportedly keen to start unwinding these sooner rather than later. As when it broke with OPEC+ in March, Moscow is done ceding market share to U.S. frackers. The latter have cut production very quickly, but their instinct to get rigs and crews back to work remains strong. Holding them in check are low prices, particularly for longer-dated futures, weighed down by the glut of physical oil and spare OPEC+ capacity that’s built up over the past couple of months. Shale does at last seem poised for rationalization. However, supply’s defining characteristics of the past four years — excess inventory and OPEC+ versus shale competition — are for now accentuated rather than altered.Similarly, the International Energy Agency’s latest investment report, which dropped this week, was consumed with Covid-19 yet trod familiar ground. This showed the theme of excess supply extending into refining, where too much capacity was opening even before the pandemic showed up.Above all, that other force of nature confronting energy markets, climate change, pervaded the discussion. If anything, the pandemic is a reminder of why we should be tackling that threat head-on. Covid-19 has both spotlighted the risk and, if stimulus efforts are shaped properly, may catalyze a response. With uncanny timing, at Chevron Corp.’s (virtual) shareholder meeting this week, the only measure where a majority of investors voted against the board concerned aligning the oil major’s lobbying with efforts to address climate change.There is still so much we don’t know about the lasting impacts of Covid-19 or, indeed, the workings of the virus itself. One thing that seems clear, however, is its tendency to magnify pre-existing conditions. For oil, those were excess supply, fraying globalization and a looming climate emergency.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Liam Denning is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy, mining and commodities. He previously was editor of the Wall Street Journal's Heard on the Street column and wrote for the Financial Times' Lex column. He was also an investment banker.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 4 Stocks to Watch as Dow Breezes Past 25,000 Points
    Zacks

    4 Stocks to Watch as Dow Breezes Past 25,000 Points

    Dow Jones' journey past 25,000 points this week could mark the beginning of a series of gains ahead, owing to some major tailwinds.

  • Financial Times

    Details on EU’s green Covid-19 recovery; Activists make point at Chevron AGM; Sandra Lee on fighting hunger; Tax avoidance

    The European Commission on Wednesday unveiled a historic plan to invest billions of euros into a greener future as part of its recovery from the coronavirus-induced economic crisis. In a budget proposal, the commission is seeking €750bn for a recovery programme that would dole out grants and loans to member states that prioritise spending for green projects.

  • Economic Data to Take a Back Seat with Trump’s News Conference the Main Event
    FX Empire

    Economic Data to Take a Back Seat with Trump’s News Conference the Main Event

    While the economic calendar is on the busier side, Trump’s news conference will be the main event, which is testing risk sentiment early on.