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First patient receives Biogen Alzheimer's drug

A U.S. hospital on Wednesday gave the first infusion of a controversial new Alzheimer's drug from Biogen.

Mark Archambault is the first patient to be treated with Aduhelm outside of a clinical trial.

The 70-year-old real estate agent from Rhode Island received his infusion at Butler Hospital's Memory and Aging Program in Providence.

He was asked what the day meant to him:

"Well, it's emotional and to think that I don't have to think about the last stage."

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Aduhelm earlier this month on evidence that it can reduce brain plaques, a likely contributor to Alzheimer's.

It was the first drug to be approved for the disease in 20 years but it hasn't been without controversy.

The FDA's own panel of scientific advisers said there was not enough evidence that the drug worked.

Three of them resigned over the FDA's decision.

Critics also point to the drug's hefty price tag, with one year's treatment costing $56,000.

The U.S. Medicare & Medicaid Services said it will soon announce how much of that cost will be covered.

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