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Indigenous Mapuche weavers attempt world record

STORY: Equipped with their looms and yarn, 500 Mapuche weavers set out to produce a one kilometre (1093 yards) long colourful loom weaving.

"We are very happy to be here. To be able to be part of this, that our culture can go on in time along with the loom. It has been maintained through the decades by our grandmothers and ancestors," said Daniela Ancao, one of the weavers who participated.

The loom weaving required over a tonne of Dohne Merino sheep wool from Tierra del Fuego, which was washed and dyed by an artisan cooperative from the Puren indigenous community.

"We want to send everyone a message...our people live with nature, protecting nature and its own rights. This is a right we have, the right to our free determination, to the free expression of our art," said the president of the Chilka Foundation, Ariel Traipi, the organization behind the event.

Each weaver worked on a panel, and all panels were later sewn together before unveiling the multi-coloured weaving.

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