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Recovery after Fiona sweeps away Canadian homes

STORY: Residents of Canada's Atlantic maritime provinces on Sunday faced the extent of devastation wrought by the powerful storm Fiona.

In the seaside town of Port Aux Basques, Newfoundland, wind and waves stripped the siding off of homes, collapsed others, left porches listing treacherously.

The historic storm slammed into eastern Canada with hurricane-force winds a day earlier, forcing evacuations, uprooting trees and powerlines, and washing some homes out to see.

Video shared on social media showed debris strewn streets and waves lapping at homes.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre estimated that Fiona was the lowest pressured storm on record to make landfall in Canada.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canadian armed forces will be deployed to help with the clean-up, adding that Fiona caused significant damage and recovery will require a big effort.

Despite the intensity of the storm, there were no serious injuries or deaths, which government officials said was a result of residents paying heed to the repeated warnings.

Still, thousands of residents across Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland were without power and dealing with patchy telecom connections, and government officials pleaded with residents for patience.

They warned that in some cases it would take weeks before essential services are fully restored.