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Rescuers comb for survivors after Hurricane Ian

STORY: Fort Myers Beach, known for its teal blue waters and seaside buildings, is now a place of desolation.

Homes have been destroyed after Hurricane Ian slammed into the island.

Amid the wreckage, Task Force 2 members have stayed to help authorities find people who remained there during the storm.

Ignacio Carroll is a member on the team.

“What we have learned is that in that period, getting people out there, it increases the chance of survival tremendously. The other day, we also recognize that people tend to have, you know, supplies for 72 hours. There's no telling when they started using those supplies even during the storm.”

Carroll says his team has to move fast to help survivors.

“We want to get to those that have run out of medication, those who may be trapped in their homes because of the debris, try to either get them out or to check on their well-being and don't want to wait for daylight. You want to start hitting the ground running as soon as possible."

Officials have set up a base camp with mobile showers and portable toilets while taking shifts on finding more survivors.

Category 4 Hurricane Ian slammed into the state last week.

Around 361,000homes and businesses were still without power in Florida on Tuesday.

And a risk-modelling firm in the US says insurers should brace for a hit of $57 billion in storm damages.

An official death toll is yet to be confirmed.

Many fear it could take years to rebuild their homes again.