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Scenes from Russia's mobilization

STORY: These are scenes from Russia's first wartime mobilization since World War Two:

Reservists in the far east territory of Kamchatka called to fight are handed rifles in a ceremony.

The mobilization comes after Russian President Vladimir Putin last week ordered the call-up of some three

hundred thousand reservists to bolster his army's flagging operations in Ukraine.

Those called up boarded buses. Some loved ones wept.

This reservist, who gave his name as Nikita, said the draft notice came to his home.

He told Reuters he'd be happy if he comes back.

At the rifle ceremony, a commander told the reservists the whole country was putting their hopes in these me.

Nine time zones west, in Russia's Rostov region, a different kind of ceremony:

A wedding, before the groom departs for a military base.

Members of the recruitment commission check ID cards, and reservists undergo a medical examination.

Some are young, others old.

Those who spoke to Reuters appeared resigned to fight.

Reservist Roman Khodakov said his mother was unhappy about it, but said he had to defend his country.

Not all Russians were willing to board the buses to bases.

This man crossed from Russia to Finland, telling Reuters "I don't want to fight for Putin."

Russians have fled to neighboring Georgia, Kazakhstan, and booked flights to Turkey and Serbia to avoid the draft.

Flights out of Russia have sold out and cars have piled up at border checkpoints.

Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov on Monday told reporters Moscow hadn't taken any decision yet on whether to seal the borders and stop the exodus.