INTC - Intel Corporation

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
50.27
+0.33 (+0.66%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous close49.94
Open49.96
Bid50.28 x 4000
Ask50.15 x 1100
Day's range49.92 - 50.66
52-week range42.36 - 59.59
Volume26,070,073
Avg. volume24,042,687
Market cap225.059B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.67
PE ratio (TTM)11.35
EPS (TTM)4.43
Earnings date25 Jul 2019
Forward dividend & yield1.26 (2.52%)
Ex-dividend date2019-08-06
1y target est51.74
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Bloomberg2 days ago

    Mnuchin, Kudlow Invite U.S. Tech Giants to Discuss Huawei Ban

    (Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump’s senior advisers have invited U.S. technology companies to the White House on Monday to discuss a resumption of sales to blacklisted Chinese telecoms giant Huawei Technologies Co., according to people familiar with the matter.White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin arranged the meeting with semiconductor and software companies because they wanted to talk about how to move forward. A person familiar with the meeting said the White House asked the companies “to discuss economic matters.”Among those invited are Intel Corp. and Qualcomm Inc., according to the people. The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed to a tentative pause in their trade war and to resume negotiations after meeting at the Group-of-20 leaders’ summit in Japan on June 29. The U.S. president at the time said he would loosen restrictions on Huawei and that China had agreed to make agricultural purchases.The White House meeting is an effort to show China that Trump is serious about allowing U.S. companies to resume business with Huawei and encourage Beijing to move forward with buying more from U.S. farmers, one of the people said.Farm GoodsChina has told the Trump administration that it would only follow through on the farm purchases once the president issues export licenses for American companies to continue shipments to Huawei. The Commerce Department is leading the process, and has said it will only grant exceptions in cases where there’s no threat to national security.U.S. companies had halted shipments after the U.S. added Huawei to a trade blacklist in May, though some have resumed certain sales after reviewing the terms of the ban.Some in the U.S. administration are arguing for America to cut off Huawei from American suppliers entirely for national security reasons, and their view is supported by China hawks on Capitol Hill.White House trade adviser Peter Navarro said earlier this month that Trump is allowing the sale to Huawei of “low grade” chips that aren’t a security risk. The administration will ensure the Chinese telecom company won’t end up dominating 5G infrastructure in the U.S., Navarro told CNN.Chipmaker FortunesHuawei is one of the world’s biggest purchasers of semiconductors. Continuing access to Chinese customers is crucial to the fortunes of chipmakers such as Intel, Qualcomm and Broadcom Inc.Some U.S.-based makers of the vital electronic components have already reported earnings and given forecasts that show the negative effects of the trade dispute. They’ve argued that their financial health is crucial to U.S. leadership of a strategically important industry.Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer spoke by phone with their Chinese counterparts about trade on Thursday. Mnuchin has said if the talks progress over the phone, he and Lighthizer may travel to Beijing for in-person meetings.Trump said on Friday that the call with Chinese officials a day earlier was “very good” but that they’ll “see what happens.”The Washington Post reported earlier that U.S. technology companies planned to meet Kudlow at the White House on Monday.\--With assistance from Mark Bergen.To contact the reporters on this story: Jenny Leonard in Washington at jleonard67@bloomberg.net;Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.net;Todd Shields in Washington at tshields3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Margaret Collins at mcollins45@bloomberg.net, Sarah McGregor, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Market Realist2 days ago

    TSMC’s and Samsung’s Rivalry Fuels Rumors

    Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing (TSM), the world’s largest contract chipmaker, competes with Samsung Foundry (SSNLF) and Global Foundries.

  • Here's What to Expect from AMD's Q2 Earnings
    Zacks3 days ago

    Here's What to Expect from AMD's Q2 Earnings

    Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) is set to report its Q2 earnings on Wednesday, July 24. The semiconductor firm's stock has surged 79% for far this year.

  • US-China Trade Talk Update: Things Are Still ‘Complicated’
    Market Realist3 days ago

    US-China Trade Talk Update: Things Are Still ‘Complicated’

    The US-China trade deal is reportedly 90% complete. However, it’s the remaining 10% that’s turning out to be difficult.

  • Earnings Preview: Intel (INTC) Q2 Earnings Expected to Decline
    Zacks3 days ago

    Earnings Preview: Intel (INTC) Q2 Earnings Expected to Decline

    Intel (INTC) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Toshiba Chip Business Changes Name Before Planned IPO
    Bloomberg3 days ago

    Toshiba Chip Business Changes Name Before Planned IPO

    (Bloomberg) -- Toshiba Memory Corp., the world’s second-largest memory chipmaker that was spun out of its parent last year, is changing its name to Kioxia as it gears up for an initial public offering.By taking a new name, the semiconductor company is marking a clean break from its roots as a unit of Toshiba Corp., which retained a 40% stake after selling it to a group led by Bain Capital. Kioxia is an invented word that combines the Japanese word for memory — kioku — and axia, the Greek term for value. The new moniker takes effect Oct. 1 under the full name Kioxia Holdings Corp.“It’s really meant to denote a fresh start as an independent company,” said Stacy Smith, the former Intel Corp. chief financial officer who became chairman of Toshiba Memory last year. “We’re not running from our rich heritage.”Toshiba, a Japanese conglomerate founded in the 1800s, invented flash memory three decades ago. The chips are used to store data in iPhones and other smartphones, as well as gadgets such as USB drives and memory cards. Memory chips are also displacing hard drives in the data centers that power cloud-based computing services and internet businesses because of their speed and reliability. Toshiba had to sell the business to pay for losses at its bankrupt nuclear power unit.While Bain has made clear that it’s planning to hold an IPO for the business by mid-2021, local media have reported that it may file for a public sale as soon as this summer or September. The investor has hired banks including Nomura Holdings Inc. and Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group Inc. to handle the IPO, people familiar with the matter have said. Smith declined to comment on the timing of the planned IPO.Separately, Smith said the company’s main factory, which was hit with a power outage on June 15, would return to full production capacity over the next several weeks. Equipment at the plant, in Yokkaichi, Japan, is already back online and is now being ramped up, he said. The disruption also impacted Western Digital Corp., its manufacturing partner at the plant.“The silver lining to that one was it happened in a time when supply was ahead of demand,” Smith said. “That’s helping us to minimize the impact on our customers.”Although Toshiba was the leader in NAND flash memory, it was outspent over the years by the likes of Samsung Electronics Co. The South Korean electronics conglomerate controlled 30% of the market at the end of 2018, followed by Toshiba with about 19%, according to researcher TrendForce Corp. The industry is now shifting to so-called 3-D NAND, which Toshiba believes gives it an edge against Samsung.Asked about recent trade tensions between Japan and South Korea, and the potential impact on memory prices, Smith said he didn’t see any impact that diverged from industry forecasts.Toshiba has been increasing investments at its Fab 6 chip facility in Yokkaichi, and also announced plans to build a new plant in the northern prefecture of Iwate that will begin mass production in 2020.\--With assistance from Yuki Furukawa.To contact the reporter on this story: Jason Clenfield in Tokyo at jclenfield@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Reed StevensonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Technology Stock Roundup: Products, Patents and More
    Zacks4 days ago

    Technology Stock Roundup: Products, Patents and More

    Some of the product news from last week were about Apple services and iPhones, Facebook Oculus, Intel's 5G patents and Amazon's satellites.

  • Big Tech Is in Big Trouble in Europe and the US
    Market Realist4 days ago

    Big Tech Is in Big Trouble in Europe and the US

    Over the last few quarters, big tech companies have been under the scanner. There are issues ranging from monopoly to handling customer data.

  • Better Buy: NXP Semiconductors vs. Intel Corporation
    Motley Fool5 days ago

    Better Buy: NXP Semiconductors vs. Intel Corporation

    Which big chipmaker is the better all-around buy?

  • Intel (INTC) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks6 days ago

    Intel (INTC) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Intel (INTC) closed at $50.12 in the latest trading session, marking a +0.4% move from the prior day.

  • Taiwan Is the Latest Flashpoint in US-China Relations
    Market Realist6 days ago

    Taiwan Is the Latest Flashpoint in US-China Relations

    US-China relations have taken a turn for the worse over the last year.

  • China Trade Deal on Rocks as Huawei Plans Big US Layoffs
    Market Realist6 days ago

    China Trade Deal on Rocks as Huawei Plans Big US Layoffs

    Huawei is preparing for “extensive layoffs” in the US, which could put the US-China trade deal on the rocks.

  • Trump Takes Credit for China’s GDP Growth Weakness
    Market Realist6 days ago

    Trump Takes Credit for China’s GDP Growth Weakness

    In a series of tweets on Monday, Trump today weighed in on China’s GDP growth, which came in at a 27-year low.

  • Intel’s Modem Patents Have Exclusive Bidder
    Market Realist6 days ago

    Intel’s Modem Patents Have Exclusive Bidder

    Intel has reportedly halted the auction of its modem patents, as it has an exclusive buyer.

  • They’re Actually Reinventing the Wheel to Keep Up With Robocars
    Bloomberg6 days ago

    They’re Actually Reinventing the Wheel to Keep Up With Robocars

    (Bloomberg) -- The car industry is reinventing the wheel to prepare for autonomous vehicles.Japan’s Sumitomo Rubber Industries Ltd., whose roots stretch back to when Henry Ford was building his Model T, is developing a “smart tire” that can monitor its own air pressure and temperature, and eventually respond by itself to changes in road conditions.Yet it’s more than just tires that are being changed. Koito Manufacturing Co., AGC Inc. and Lear Corp. are putting semiconductors and sensors inside headlights, glass and seats to make them as intelligent as the cars driving themselves.Alphabet Inc.’s Waymo LLC, Intel Corp.’s Mobileye NV and Baidu Inc. dominate the core technology for autonomous driving, yet suppliers still count on finding their own space in the business. Parts for advanced driver-assistance systems and autonomous driving are expected to become a $57 billion market within a decade, according to BIS Research, and old-school companies born during the early days of the automobile know they must either adapt or risk extinction.“Autonomous driving is a challenge for carmakers, but it’s a bigger challenge for conventional parts makers,” said Zhou Lei, a partner at Deloitte Tohmatsu Consulting in Tokyo. “They are striving to become the ‘five senses’ of the vehicle so they can remain relevant.”Carmakers have disclosed more than $14 billion in investments in autonomy and mobility companies since 2010, according to data compiled by BloombergNEF. Toyota Motor Corp. tops that list at about $3 billion.Though the deployment of highly autonomous commercial fleets isn’t expected to begin until at least 2022, the looming threat is that the increasingly sophisticated designs of those cars will render some ordinary parts –- and their suppliers -- unnecessary.For example, why would a self-driving vehicle that uses cameras, lasers and sensors to get around need headlights or mirrors?Smart HeadlightsThe response from century-old Koito Manufacturing is to reinvent the headlight. The Tokyo-based company, which traces its roots to making lenses for railway signal lamps in 1912, is adding sensors and artificial-intelligence chips to lamps it plans to introduce by about 2025.Positioned on the four edges of the vehicle, the lamps will be able to process information and react, such as by illuminating poorly lit crossings, signaling pedestrians that it’s safe to cross and raising an alarm to surrounding drivers by flashing a specific color.The company’s current customers include Toyota, Volkswagen AG and General Motors Co., according to data compiled by Bloomberg.“Autonomous driving will change the role of lamps,” said Yuji Yokoya, who recently retired as executive vice president of the Tokyo-based company. “We see them not just as lamps, but more as corner modules.”Tokyo-based automotive glass-maker AGC is re-imagining that product and making it part of a vehicle’s communication system.Window AntennasThe company, founded in 1907 as Asahi Glass Co. Ltd., is designing windows with built-in antennas for 5G wireless connections, allowing cars to send and receive signals with other vehicles and infrastructure. AGC’s customers include Toyota, Tesla Inc. and Sony Corp., according to data compiled by Bloomberg.An overarching challenge is to convince carmakers that the smarter -- and more expensive -- components make economic sense. Not all parts manufacturers need a radical transformation to keep up with autonomous and electric vehicles since they’ve been evolving gradually as the industry takes shape, said Deepesh Rathore, an independent automobile analyst based in Bengaluru.“A car is a car, and the shape of the tire doesn’t change,” Rathore said. “I can imagine some of those companies having to reinvent everything -- especially those working with engines and gearbox technologies.”Even components that aren’t facing an immediate existential threat are evolving. Sumitomo Rubber is researching tires that can transmit data about road conditions to the car as well as to other vehicles.Smart Tires & SeatsThe next step will be a tire that automatically adapts to road conditions. When the tire detects water, it will change the structure of its surface into one that is optimal for wet roads, said Kozaburo Nakaseko, an official in the research and development division of Sumitomo.“Tires need to become smarter,” Nakaseko said. “We cannot move into an autonomous car society without information about the roads we drive on.”The innovations aren’t just limited to Japan. In the U.S., Lear Corp. is equipping its car seats with biometric sensors to detect stress, drowsiness and changes in heart rate, and then activate treatments in response. The seats also can transmit data to a doctor or family member if necessary, the company said.Other functions include controls that let users create individual “micro-climates” where they are sitting, and noise-canceling features in the headrests, the Southfield, Michigan-based company said.“All the mechanical stuff will just slowly go away, and there is a lot of electronics coming in instead,” said Egil Juliussen, principal auto analyst with IHS Markit. “You have to change in order to survive.”\--With assistance from Mei Futonaka, Anurag Kotoky, Indranil Ghosh and Gabrielle Coppola.To contact the reporters on this story: Ma Jie in Tokyo at jma124@bloomberg.net;Nao Sano in Tokyo at nsano3@bloomberg.net;Masatsugu Horie in Tokyo at mhorie3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, Ville Heiskanen, Michael TigheFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • PC Shipments Bounce Back in Q2: LNVGY, HPQ & More in View
    Zacks9 days ago

    PC Shipments Bounce Back in Q2: LNVGY, HPQ & More in View

    Here's a sneak peek of the worldwide PC market performance in the second quarter of 2019, per IDC and Gartner report.

  • China’s June Trade Data Was a Mixed Bag
    Market Realist9 days ago

    China’s June Trade Data Was a Mixed Bag

    Today, China released its trade data for June. China’s dollar-denominated exports fell 1.3%, while its imports in US dollar terms fell 7.3% last month.

  • U.S. Tech Firms Cozy Up to China Despite Trade Turmoil
    Bloomberg9 days ago

    U.S. Tech Firms Cozy Up to China Despite Trade Turmoil

    (Bloomberg) -- In a packed ballroom in Beijing’s national convention center, the executive from a major technology company laid out ambitious plans for the future of artificial intelligence in China. He explained how customized semiconductors would help power everything from autonomous cars to voice-activated industrial machines.Only this wasn’t a state-backed enterprise. This was Intel Corp., the largest U.S. chipmaker.The company’s AI chief, Naveen Rao, pledged to work closely, “engineer to engineer," on cutting-edge technology with the 7,000 people that attended Baidu Inc.’s annual developers conference last week. Intel was the top sponsor of the event.Rao made no mention of politics, though his overwhelming support of Baidu, a Chinese national tech champion, sent a powerful message: Even as U.S. and Chinese leaders are locked in a fierce battle over technological supremacy, companies like Intel remain big backers of China’s tech industry because they rely on the country for significant contributions of revenue, production chains and even talent.Intel made 27% of its revenue in China last year, more than in the U.S. or any other market, but it’s fighting to hold on to customers there that it spent decades cultivating. Like many American multinationals with large businesses in the country, Intel is walking a fine line between holding on to that lucrative market and keeping in Washington’s good graces. Neutrality is becoming a tougher stance to maintain."There’s been a psychotic break” in what some leaders in the U.S. government want and what American businesses want, said Josh Dorfman, founder of One Thousand Million, a China-focused consultancy and think tank based in Dallas. "Unlike in China, U.S. companies aren’t beholden to the country and are not obligated in any way, shape, or form to be patriotic. They want to make money."An Intel spokesman said the company remains engaged with Chinese customers that aren’t on the U.S.’s list of those it sees as a security threat. China is a substantial market for Intel and it has no intention of pulling out now.Intel isn’t alone. Apple Inc. is heavily dependent on China not only for the manufacture of Mac computers and iPhones but it’s also a major consumer market, accounting for about 20% of sales. Even as U.S. President Donald Trump threatened tariffs that would hit Apple products, the California-based company was making plans to shift production of its new Mac Pro computer to China, sending a clear signal of support.While some companies are considering moving part of their production out of the country, many others are making gestures of goodwill. Walmart Inc. last week pledged to invest $1.2 billion in China to upgrade logistics distribution centers. Boeing Co. is in negotiations to sell 100 jetliners to Chinese airlines in one of its largest-ever deals, Bloomberg News reported. And last month, 600 U.S. companies and trade groups signed a letter to Trump warning of tariff-related hits to their businesses.IBM’s Greater China group chairman Liming Chen said that the escalation of China-U.S. trade frictions has created a "confusing environment" for businesses. He outlined International Business Machine Corp.’s long relationship with China, dating back to its products first entering the country in the 1920s, and formally establishing a Shanghai office in 1936."IBM has participated in the rapid development of China over the past 40 years, while China has also nourished IBM," he wrote in a post on WeChat in June, calling the country an "indispensable part of our global strategy map."The U.S.-China trade war is anchored in competition to dominate the next generation of wireless networks and other technologies as much as politics. The Trump administration worries that American companies in search of profits could actually help China’s tech industry eclipse U.S. prowess in sensitive areas like artificial intelligence and machine learning.The chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, Joseph Dunford, lambasted Alphabet Inc. in March for Google’s AI work in China, which he alleged "indirectly benefits the Chinese military." Trump repeated the critique in a subsequent tweet, questioning the Google parent’s loyalties. Google has said it doesn’t work with China’s military.The same nationalistic fervor is partly behind the Commerce Department’s May prohibition on selling American components to Chinese telecom behemoth Huawei Technologies Co. Despite Trump’s recent pledge to ease restrictions, Huawei remains on America’s so-called entities list and U.S. firms must apply for special licenses to sell parts to the company.That hasn’t stopped chipmaker Micron Technology Inc. from feverishly trying to find ways to keep supplying the company, one of its largest customers. The U.S. semiconductor industry also lobbied the Trump administration to loosen restrictions on Huawei.Still, American tech companies are facing a new global reality. They may no longer be able to overlook geopolitics in favor of profits. China may not be the growth savior it once was.Tech companies "must now live in a world where their Chinese business partners and global value chains at any given day could blow up," said James Lewis, director of the tech and public policy program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington think-tank. “Trump might have backed off Huawei for now but next week it could be something different and any of these companies are fair game.”Lewis, who previously served as the U.S. Commerce Department’s lead for national security and espionage concerns related to high-technology trade with China, said Chinese firms are also racing to become less reliant on the very American firms bending over backwards to keep their business.Splitting the two economies won’t be easy. Research, development, manufacturing and talent in the U.S. and China are still very much interconnected."Innovation by American companies is fueled by access to the Chinese market," said Samm Sacks, cybersecurity policy and China digital economy fellow at think tank New America, in Congressional testimony in May.For Intel’s AI chief, collaboration with China helps the company to build better products and bring new technology to market fast.“I’m proud of the strong and growing partnership between Intel and Baidu,” Intel’s Rao said in Beijing, after greeting developers with a hearty “nihao.” “By working together to advance AI, Baidu and Intel are helping to usher in a world where AI is ubiquitous.”\--With assistance from Gao Yuan.To contact the reporters on this story: Shelly Banjo in Hong Kong at sbanjo@bloomberg.net;Zheping Huang in Hong Kong at zhuang245@bloomberg.net;Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Alexa, Tech Companies Are Leaving China: Where Will They Go?
    Market Realist10 days ago

    Alexa, Tech Companies Are Leaving China: Where Will They Go?

    Global consumer tech companies are reportedly looking to move out of China amid the still unresolved trade war.

  • Another Debt Ceiling Showdown Is on the Horizon
    Market Realist10 days ago

    Another Debt Ceiling Showdown Is on the Horizon

    Earlier this week, the Bipartisan Policy Center said that the US government could hit the debt ceiling in September.

  • Apple Might Scoop Up Thousands of Intel Patents in Pursuit of 5G Modem
    Motley Fool11 days ago

    Apple Might Scoop Up Thousands of Intel Patents in Pursuit of 5G Modem

    The sooner Apple can extricate itself from a relationship with Qualcomm, the better.

  • Why Smartphone Supplier Stocks Jumped in June
    Motley Fool11 days ago

    Why Smartphone Supplier Stocks Jumped in June

    The China-U.S. trade tension that's been weighing down this sector appeared to start relaxing last month.

  • Apple, Chip Makers Not Giving Up on China Amid US-China Tech War
    Market Realist11 days ago

    Apple, Chip Makers Not Giving Up on China Amid US-China Tech War

    In recent months, the “Tech Cold War” has reared its head, but Apple doesn’t seem ready to throw in the towel in the Chinese market.