• GlobeNewswire

    Amid the COVID-19 crisis and the looming economic recession, the Ethylene Carbonate market worldwide will grow by a projected US$114.3 Million, during the analysis period

    New York, July 04, 2020 -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "Global Ethylene Carbonate Industry" - https://www.reportlinker.com/p05899446/?utm_source=GNW 7.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Kia Canada annonce le meilleur mois de vente de son histoire Canadienne

    Au mois de juin, Kia Canada annonce une augmentation de ses ventes de 7 % par rapport à l’année précédente, atteignant un total de 8 647 unités, après un mois de mai.

  • GiveSafely.io Launches as a Secure Trust-based Donation Platform for Leading Charities to Incentivize and Interact With New Donors
    PR Newswire

    GiveSafely.io Launches as a Secure Trust-based Donation Platform for Leading Charities to Incentivize and Interact With New Donors

    80.5% of BBB Accredited charities anticipate that their 2020 revenue will be lower than expected and are searching for new ways to engage Millennials and Generation Z donors.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Amid the COVID-19 crisis and the looming economic recession, the Ethylene Glycol market worldwide will grow by a projected US$7.4 Billion, during the analysis period

    New York, July 04, 2020 -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "Global Ethylene Glycol Industry" - https://www.reportlinker.com/p05899447/?utm_source=GNW 8.

  • Protesters block Mount Rushmore road before Trump visit
    Reuters Videos

    Protesters block Mount Rushmore road before Trump visit

    Native American protesters were arrested after blocking a road to the South Dakota landmark, according to video livestreamed on social media. In a video shared with Reuters, several white vans blocked the road and protesters criticized Trump's visit for increasing the risk of spreading the COVID-19 virus and for celebrating U.S. independence in an area that is sacred to them. Trump later viewed a fireworks display with thousands of people at the South Dakota landmark, which depicts the images of U.S. presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Amid the COVID-19 crisis and the looming economic recession, the Evaporative Condensing Units market worldwide will grow by a projected US$481.3 Million, during the analysis period

    New York, July 04, 2020 -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "Global Evaporative Condensing Units Industry" -.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of SENS.A earnings conference call or presentation 9-Jun-20 8:30pm GMT

    Q1 2020 Senseonics Holdings Inc Earnings Call

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of FIVE.OQ earnings conference call or presentation 9-Jun-20 8:30pm GMT

    Q1 2020 Five Below Inc Earnings Call

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of 2201.T earnings conference call or presentation 22-May-20 10:59am GMT

    Full Year 2020 Morinaga & Co Ltd Earnings Call

  • USA TODAY

    What stores and restaurants are open Fourth of July? Here's the list of businesses open or closed

    Costco and Trader Joe's are closed this Fourth of July but many stores and restaurants will be open including Walmart, Target, Starbucks, McDonald's.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of VISI earnings conference call or presentation 16-Jun-20 9:00pm GMT

    Q2 2020 Volt Information Sciences Inc Earnings Call

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of IPL.TO earnings conference call or presentation 8-May-20 3:00pm GMT

    Q1 2020 Inter Pipeline Ltd Earnings Call

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of HYDR.MZ earnings conference call or presentation 4-Jun-20 1:00pm GMT

    Q1 2020 Federal Hydro-Generating Company RusHydro PAO Earnings Call (IFRS)

  • Reuters

    N.Korea says no need to sit down with US for talks

    North Korea does not feel the need to have talks with the United States, which would be nothing more than "a political tool" for Washington, a senior North Korean diplomat said on Saturday, ahead of a U.S. envoy's visit to South Korea. Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui said negotiations would not work out between Washington and Pyongyang and there will be no change in North Korea's policy. "We do not feel any need to sit face to face with the U.S., as it does not consider the DPRK-U.S. dialogue as nothing more than a tool for grappling its political crisis," Choe said in a statement carried by state-run KCNA news agency.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Amid the COVID-19 crisis and the looming economic recession, the Exhaust Systems market worldwide will grow by a projected US$36.5 Billion, during the analysis period

    New York, July 04, 2020 -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "Global Exhaust Systems Industry" - https://www.reportlinker.com/p05899454/?utm_source=GNW An.

  • What restaurants are open July 4? Applebee's, Chipotle, Chick-fil-A are among eateries open this Independence Day
    USA TODAY

    What restaurants are open July 4? Applebee's, Chipotle, Chick-fil-A are among eateries open this Independence Day

    If you're not firing up the grill Independence Day 2020, most national restaurant chains are open in some capacity Saturday.

  • What stores are open Fourth of July? J.C. Penney, Macy's, Target, Kohl's and Walmart are but Costco is closed
    USA TODAY

    What stores are open Fourth of July? J.C. Penney, Macy's, Target, Kohl's and Walmart are but Costco is closed

    This Fourth of July will be the last for Pier 1 Imports and closing J.C. Penney and Tuesday Morning stores. But COVID-19 is changing holiday sales.

  • Trump blasts 'left wing cultural revolution'
    Reuters Videos

    Trump blasts 'left wing cultural revolution'

    Speaking underneath a famed landmark that depicts four U.S. presidents, Trump warned that the demonstrations over racial inequality in American society threatened the foundations of the U.S. political system. "Make no mistake, this left wing cultural revolution is designed to overthrow the American revolution," Trump said. "Our children are taught in school to hate their own country," he added. The event drew an estimated 7,500 people, packed tightly into an amphitheater beneath the famed landmark that depicts the images of U.S. presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. Masks were offered to attendees but many did not wear them. Trump has held three public events that have drawn thousands of supporters over the past three weeks, despite warnings from public-health officials who have urged Americans to avoid large gatherings as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage the country. Seven states posted a record number of new COVID-19 cases on Friday.

  • Financial Times

    PhDs and MAs: a risk/reward thesis

    More university students may stay on to do an MA or PhD. Postgraduate study has been rising in popularity. The number of doctoral degrees awarded across the OECD increased by 80 per cent between 2000 and 2017.

  • Boris Johnson Has a Personal Stake in Fighting Obesity
    Bloomberg

    Boris Johnson Has a Personal Stake in Fighting Obesity

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In late March, Boris Johnson and Matt Hancock, Britain’s portly prime minister and its slender health secretary, both contracted Covid-19. Hancock had a mild case and was back to work a week later. Johnson was lucky to come out alive after a spell in intensive care.Ever since then he has been on a mission. Johnson believes that being overweight was a factor in his contracting a more severe form of the disease, and a growing body of evidence backs that up. In a study of 17,000 Covid-positive hospital patients, those with a body mass index of more than 30 (considered obese) had a 33% greater risk of dying than non-obese patients. A separate study of people in U.K. intensive care units for the condition found that 73% were either overweight, obese or morbidly obese.The British prime minister once burnished his libertarian credentials by decrying sin taxes on producers of unhealthy snacks and sugary drinks, but the coronavirus has changed him. The food industry should prepare itself for the consequences.The same connection between weight and Covid-19 has been borne out in other countries. In France, a study of people admitted to intensive care units at Lyon University Hospital, published in the Lancet, found 25% of severe cases were obese. Researchers at New York University had similar findings.Scientists are still trying to understand the connection better, but obesity seems to be a risk on various levels. Being significantly overweight puts greater strain on the heart and lungs, which makes fighting the virus more difficult. The infection enters the body through the enzyme ACE2, higher levels of which are found in adipose, or fatty, tissue (which obese people have more of).The immune response in very overweight patients also seems to be compromised, due to the way a particular type of immune cell, called macrophages, invade the fat tissue and can send the body’s immune system into self-destructive overdrive. Hospital care may also be complicated by a person’s size and any underlying, but as yet undiscovered, health issues.The Covid-obesity link was observed in China too, but it’s a bigger worry in Britain and the U.S., where many people are overweight. Nearly 40% of American adults under 60 have a body mass index over 30. Nearly two-thirds of U.K. adults are overweight or obese, according to the National Health Service. Obesity is prevalent in 29% of adults and one in five children aged between 10 and 11.Critically, many of the recent Covid-19 flare-ups are in more deprived areas, and obesity rates are higher there. In Britain, the most obese country in Europe (apart from Malta), obesity is twice as high in the poorest areas as the richest ones. In the U.S., obesity has been linked to levels of income and education, and to ethnicity.The question is what to do about that. Given the complexity of environmental, biological and psychological factors, weight isn’t an easy policy area. The vast majority of those who manage to lose a lot of weight find they gain back most of it. Researchers have made progress in understanding why that’s so, and the way calorie-reduction regimens trigger countervailing increases in appetite that ultimately defeat even the most determined dieters.Cultural stereotypes and stigmas haven’t quite caught up with the research. If you scroll down the comments of any social media feed on the obesity debate you’ll find typical rejoinders with some combination of the words willpower, diet, exercise or portion control. There are accusatory glances at parents who don’t monitor the weight of their children.Johnson has certainly played with those stereotypes. When he was its editor, the conservative Spectator magazine ran an article warning people not to hire a “fatty” for a nanny, suggesting they were likely to be unclean, lazy and derelict in their childcare duties. Even for a magazine that prides itself on being contrarian, the piece was unscientific and grotesque.In a 2004 newspaper column, Johnson said it was people’s “own fat fault” if they were obese, a view he described last week as embarrassing. In his Tory leadership campaign, he vowed to end the “continuing creep of the nanny state” and roll back sin taxes. Now, however, he is weighing in on the side of the interventionists, distancing himself from his old views. The government hasn’t specified how it will act, but it is considering a range of more aggressive measures.One is likely to be expanding the U.K.’s sugar tax. While Britain has a limited levy on soft drinks, which seems to be having an impact, there are too many exemptions.Even an expanded sugar tax is only part of the solution, as Sally Davies, the country’s former chief medical officer, has argued. Education is needed for younger children, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds who are more likely to eat packaged and processed foods — and Brits also need protection from the fire hose of junk-food advertising. So far, that’s been a very uneven fight. A report from the Obesity Health Alliance a few years ago noted that the government had spent 5.2 million pounds a year on its healthy-eating campaign, while confectioners and purveyors of junk food spent 143 million pounds on ads.New interventions would no doubt be greeted with angry howls from the food industry. But some of the old arguments against taking action — especially that sin taxes don’t work or affect the poor disproportionately — no longer hold up. Johnson’s backing for action adds political weight, and muscle, to the other side.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Therese Raphael is a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion. She was editorial page editor of the Wall Street Journal Europe.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Amid the COVID-19 crisis and the looming economic recession, the Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS) market worldwide will grow by a projected US$70 Billion, during the analysis period

    New York, July 04, 2020 -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "Global Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS) Industry" -.

  • Billboard Heiress Lists $15 Million L.A. Starter House
    Variety

    Billboard Heiress Lists $15 Million L.A. Starter House

    Now that she's spooned out a whopping $24 million for a brand-new residential extravaganza in L.A.'s princely Pacific Palisades area, formerly New York-based Van Wagner billboard heiress Hillary Thomas has no need for her other Palisades mansion, a smaller but still stunning and designer-done estate in the prestigious Riviera neighborhood pocket. The East Coast-style house […]

  • Reuters

    Hong Kong officials disappointed at Canada's move to suspend extradition pact

    Senior officials in Hong Kong said on Saturday they were "very disappointed" at Canada's decision to suspend its extradition treaty with the Chinese-ruled city and again slammed Washington for "interfering" in its affairs. Beijing imposed a new national security law this week on the former British colony, despite protests from Hong Kong residents and Western nations, setting China's freest city and a major financial hub on a more authoritarian track. "The Canadian government needs to explain to the rule of law, and explain to the world, why it allows fugitives not to bear their legal responsibilities," Hong Kong's security chief, John Lee, told a radio programme on Saturday.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Amid the COVID-19 crisis and the looming economic recession, the Extruded Plastics market worldwide will grow by a projected US$49.8 Billion, during the analysis period

    New York, July 04, 2020 -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "Global Extruded Plastics Industry" - https://www.reportlinker.com/p05899463/?utm_source=GNW 3.

  • How Britain’s Restaurant Crisis Can Be Eased by Private Equity
    Bloomberg

    How Britain’s Restaurant Crisis Can Be Eased by Private Equity

    (Bloomberg) -- As of today, restaurants in England can reopen. While that could herald a rush of customers, the date didn’t come soon enough for some -- a swathe of establishments have closed permanently.With Covid-19 still spreading and the outlook bleak, restaurants will need cash to survive the bad times. They’ll also need to adjust their business models to meet the demands of service in an era of social distancing. Private equity can help with both.Emma Reynolds, founder of the Tonkotsu chain of ramen noodle shops, is familiar with the advantages of finance from these pools of private capital. She said if she hadn’t received a 5 million pound ($6.2 million) investment in 2019 from private-equity firm YFM Equity Partners, she would now likely be out of business. It wasn’t just about the money.Sales plummeted after the government ordered all restaurants and shops closed in late March, though Tonkotsu managed to bring in revenues equivalent to around 25% of the pre-Covid take by offering delivery. YFM convened daily support calls, provided advice on how to deal with creditors and banks, and shared examples from other portfolio companies, she said.“They were really good at crisis management and offering support and advice,” she said. “It helped us to stay solvent.”Plans to nearly double the number of Tonkotsu outlets to 20 sites are a year behind schedule, but can still happen, said Mike Clarke, investment director at YFM. He expects to keep investing in restaurants and says eateries will turn to outside capital as the government withdraws its support. This included a furlough program, which let companies park staff on government-funded payrolls, and state-backed loans.Read more: The Retail Apocalypse Is Getting Even Darker for U.K. LandlordsIt may be surprising that the likes of private equity are still seen as a potential savior for restaurants. Companies backed by PE firms had an especially hard time qualifying for government rescue finance, said Kate Nicholls, chief executive officer of trade group UKHospitality.There was confusion at first over how to assess portfolio companies for state-backed loans. Some banks looked at the private equity fund’s total revenue when appraising whether a single restaurant brand could qualify. That meant some eateries missed out on loans designed for businesses of their size, she said.PE-backed steak house group Hawksmoor, popular with City of London dealmakers, was among those deemed ineligible for government finance because leverage levels were too high -- loan notes issued by its investors in lieu of equity were counted as debt.Russell Norman, co-founder of the Polpo chain of Venetian cicchetti restaurants, is aware of the pitfalls of seeking private equity backing. In recent years, he attempted three times to expand his chain to make it more attractive to investors. The efforts only resulted in a diminished bank balance and no partnership that could provide funding and other support.This left him facing the pandemic without a war chest from a deep-pocketed backer, and the threat of running out of money if business did not recover by the end of the year.“If income is zero and outgoings continue you will bleed dry,” he said.Shake-UpSo restaurants are clamoring for support. Andrew Smith, who in June finished raising around $100 million for a U.S.-focused restaurant investment fund called Savory, said a large number of American locations are asking him for help, including some “super strong brands.” He wouldn’t elaborate on any names except to say they include those that normally would not talk to him.Smith, who is based in the U.S. and founded the Four Foods Group, said British and American markets face a shake-up. Even fine dining establishments will need to rethink their business, and might need to consider offering delivery, he said.That dovetails with the view of YFM’s Clark. He said one consideration for new Tonkotsu locations is whether they fall within coverage areas of delivery service providers such as Deliveroo and Uber Eats. Other ideas including pared-down menus, kitchen side doors so delivery bikers don’t clutter up main entrances, and perhaps physical barriers, like plexiglass, between tables.This is not to say all PE firms are pushing to invest. KKR & Co. Inc. is seeking buyers for some of the chains in Casual Dining Group, which it took control of in 2018. The group, whose brands include Bella Italia, Cafe Rouge and Las Iguanas restaurants, has begun to shutter more than a third of its 250 sites, and lay off staff.Clarke also points out that firms that can’t generate sales will start needing cash again in the fall as government support is withdrawn. In addition, restaurants need to be prepared to close down again if the virus resurges, he said.Takeaway CocktailsMeanwhile, getting creative may be the best way forward. Owners of big chains with large city center locations and landlords unwilling to adjust the rents are figuring out how they can adapt, said Sarah Willingham, a serial entrepreneur and dragon on television’s “Dragons’ Den,” Britain’s version of America’s “Shark Tank.”“You talk about social distancing in these chains, and if their fixed overheads remain the same you won’t make any money, and you will be lucky to break even,” she said. “You have to be flexible and pivot your business model.”The chain of bars she part-owns, The London Cocktail Club, is about to introduce a line of prepackaged drinks. The inspiration for this came in part from the bars in her home town of Brighton, on the U.K.’s southern coastline, which started delivering drinks to peoples’ homes.If restaurants can find a way to navigate the crisis, they may find their customers waiting for them.“I don’t think the industry will ever go under,” said Savory’s Smith. “People still need to eat.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.