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    Embraer's Eve rolls out flying taxi prototype

    STORY: Electric aircraft maker Eve has showcased its first full-scale "flying taxi" prototype as the company aims to obtain certification to enter service in 2026.The prototype of its electric vertical take-off and landing aircraft was rolled out at an event with investors and clients at the Brazilian planemaker's plant in early July. Eve CEO Johann Bordais told Reuters the prototype is expected to fly by the end of this year or the start of 2025.Bordais said this version is completely remote so the company can test aerodynamics and the transition from vertical to horizontal flight.The final vehicle will seat four passengers and a pilot and is expected to ferry travelers on short city trips to beat traffic. It's one of a bevy of startups worldwide developing battery-powered aircraft for the purpose. Eve applied for certification to Brazil's civil aviation regulator in 2022 and debuted on the New York Stock Exchange the same year, raising nearly $400 million.It also secured a $92 million loan from a Brazilian state development bank and recently announced a fresh round of fundraising totaling $94 million.Bordais says the company is currently financed to develop the product until 2027 but says some challenges still exist. Power grids in cities around the world are not ready for so-called flying cars, from the electricity supply to ports for vertical take-off and landing.Eve has amassed nearly 3,000 potential orders ahead of production, which it hopes to eventually convert into firm orders.Interested clients include U.S. carrier United, charter firm Global Crossing and aircraft lessor Azorra.

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    CrowdStrike shares tumble 13% on IT outage impact

    STORY: CrowdStrike is still dealing with the aftermath of the global computer outage Friday.Its shares fell as much as 13% Monday morning after closing down 11% Friday.Wall Street analysts downgraded the stock on concerns over the financial fallout for the cybersecurity firm from the outage.CrowdStrike's glitchy update to its security software crashed computers powered by Microsoft's Windows operating system - disrupting internet services around the world.Airlines like Delta are continuing to feel the effects - it canceled more than 600 flights on Monday and has canceled more than 5,000 flights since this incident occurred.The outage affected healthcare and banking too, raising questions about how to avoid such a situation in the future and whether such critical software should remain in the hands of a few companies.Analysts say they largely expect CrowdStrike to recover given its leading position in the industry though concerns around reputational damage, a potential hit to new customer contracts, competition and possible legal tussles remain.Meanwhile, rival SentinelOne's shares surged 11% on Monday, with J.P. Morgan calling the company "the most obvious beneficiary" of what analysts say is the widest IT outage in modern history.

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    Israel orders evacuation, dozens of Gazans killed

    STORY: Israeli shelling and airstrikes killed dozens of Palestinians near Khan Younis, Gaza medics said on Monday (July 22), as many fled the damaged city. That’s after Israel issued new evacuation orders to some neighborhoods in southern Gaza in what it said were renewed attacks in those areas. Medics said the Palestinians were killed by tank salvoes in some towns just east of Khan Younis, with the area also bombarded by air.The Gaza health ministry said the dead included several women and children and that dozens of others had been injured by Israeli fire. The Hamas-run ministry does not distinguish between militants and civilians in its death tallies.Outside of Khan Younis' Nasser hospital, prayers were held for victims of the strikes.Medical staff there said that the situation at the medical facility, where a large number of casualties were being treated, was "out of control".Ayman al-Qahwaji, whose sister was killed, branded it a "massacre of civilians" - and said many were asleep when the attacks happened.Palestinian officials said 400,000 people are living in the targeted areas.Adding that those asked to evacuate were not given time to leave before the Israeli strikes began.Some families fled on donkey carts, others on foot, carrying mattresses and other belongings. Jabr Thabet is among them: "We demand the countries of the world and the leaders of the world to look at us in a humanitarian state and see the situation that we are in. We are displaced three times a week. We are now displaced under iron and fire. We are being targeted while we are being displaced, and there is also no transportation. The financial situation is difficult, we have no money to travel, to go and return, our situation is difficult."An Israeli military statement said the new evacuation orders were given due to renewed Palestinian militant attacks - including rockets launched from the targeted areas in eastern Khan Younis.The military added that to facilitate the evacuations, it was adjusting the boundaries of a humanitarian zone in Al-Mawasi to keep civilians away from areas of combat with Hamas-led Palestinian militants.Israel vowed to eradicate Hamas after militants killed 1,200 people and took more than 250 hostages in an Oct.7 cross-border assault, Israeli tallies say.Gaza health authorities said the death toll among Palestinians in Israel's retaliatory offensive had exceeded 39,000 as of Monday.Ceasefire efforts remain at an impasse after nine months of war.