KO - The Coca-Cola Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
57.68
-0.15 (-0.26%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close57.83
Open57.85
Bid57.51 x 800
Ask57.68 x 900
Day's range57.46 - 57.87
52-week range44.42 - 57.87
Volume8,228,446
Avg. volume11,484,270
Market cap247.129B
Beta (5Y monthly)N/A
PE ratio (TTM)31.85
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings date29 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est59.48
  • Coca-Cola (KO) Stock Moves -0.26%: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Coca-Cola (KO) Stock Moves -0.26%: What You Should Know

    Coca-Cola (KO) closed the most recent trading day at $57.68, moving -0.26% from the previous trading session.

  • Coca-Cola (KO) Reports Next Week: What to Expect
    Zacks

    Coca-Cola (KO) Reports Next Week: What to Expect

    Coke (KO) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Procter & Gamble (PG) Beats on Q2 Earnings, Down on Sales Miss
    Zacks

    Procter & Gamble (PG) Beats on Q2 Earnings, Down on Sales Miss

    Procter & Gamble's (PG) bottom line beats estimates in second-quarter fiscal 2020, while sales miss. Adjusted free cash flow productivity increases to 100%.

  • Molson Coors' (TAP) Craft Segment to Acquire Atwater Brewery
    Zacks

    Molson Coors' (TAP) Craft Segment to Acquire Atwater Brewery

    Molson Coors (TAP) announces the acquisition of Detroit-based Atwater Brewery. The company's objective is to ensure that beer is relished by customers across the markets.

  • What's in the Offing for Diageo (DEO) in 1H FY20 Earnings?
    Zacks

    What's in the Offing for Diageo (DEO) in 1H FY20 Earnings?

    Diageo's (DEO) acquisition and expansion efforts as well as operating margin growth are likely to aid results in the first half of fiscal 2020.

  • Can Coca-Cola (KO) Retain Its Positive Earnings Trend in Q4?
    Zacks

    Can Coca-Cola (KO) Retain Its Positive Earnings Trend in Q4?

    Coca-Cola's (KO) fourth-quarter 2019 results are likely to reflect benefits from its innovation efforts, product investments, strength across regions, and robust price/mix and volume.

  • The Gin and Tonic Market Is Getting Crowded
    Bloomberg

    The Gin and Tonic Market Is Getting Crowded

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The Fever-Tree gin and tonic has lost its fizz.Fevertree Drinks Plc on Monday warned on profits, sending its shares down as much as 26%. The pioneer in high-end cocktail mixers said sales expanded by just 10% last year and earnings fell 5% compared with 2018. That’s a stark contrast to previous statements from the maker of Sicilian lemon tonic water and spiced orange ginger ale, which usually upgraded expectations.Part of the reason for the warning — slow sales in supermarkets — looks plausible. Britain’s grocers endured a sluggish Christmas and New Year’s trading period. The Boris bounce that was supposed to have Brits lifting the glasses after a decisive December election didn’t materialize. What’s more worrying is that the market for bars and clubs suffered over the holidays, too. That’s a concern given that the broader sector for eating and drinking out had a solid Christmas, according to industry data from the Coffer Peach Business Tracker.There was also unwelcome news out of the U.S., where Chief Executive Officer Tim Warrillow said the company is cutting its prices, from those prevalent at the very top end of the drinks market to merely premium. Consequently, Fevertree is forecasting sales expansion there by a percentage in the low double digits this year, compared with 33% in 2019. Not only is this mysterious — surely Fevertree’s issue was building brand awareness not pricing — but it is a concern for investors, as demand on the other side of the Atlantic was supposed to pick up as the U.K. matured.Fevertree signaled that U.K. growth could accelerate later this year, particularly in comparison with such a difficult 2019. But that looks optimistic. Not only do consumers show no signs of loosening the purse strings, but the danger is that their appetites may have shifted permanently away from the gin and tonics that had them reaching for Fevertree mixers.The U.S. is expected to expand more quickly after 2020, but this is not guaranteed, and it’s some way off anyway. And in the meantime Fevertree is facing competition from all sides from small niche players to big beverage companies such as Coca-Cola Co. For now at least, investors can’t count on this market for the next leg of growth.  With Monday’s lurch downwards, Fevertree shares have lost more than 60% of their value compared with their peak in September 2018. And despite Fevertree’s optimism, it’s hard to see a quick bounce back from here. When high flyers lose their momentum, it can be difficult to recapture: Just look at online retailer Asos Plc, which has struggled to recover from a profit warning in December 2018.The only silver lining is that with Fevertree’s historic premium to rivals slashed, it  could encourage a big beverage or consumer goods company to slot it into their portfolios. But, like investors, they may want to see evidence that the company is stabilizing. After all, its attraction was fast growth, and while 10% revenue expansion is still much better than what’s currently to be had in consumer goods or food retail, it’s not at the levels Fevertree enjoyed over the past few years.It’s clearly not yet the time to say cheers.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Coca-Cola Adds Two Powerade Sports Drinks, Enhances Portfolio
    Zacks

    Coca-Cola Adds Two Powerade Sports Drinks, Enhances Portfolio

    Coca-Cola (KO) launches Powerade Ultra and Powerade Power Water under Powerade Sports drink category. This is likely to aid the company's sales.

  • Coca-Cola's Powerade adds new products to its lineup
    Yahoo Finance

    Coca-Cola's Powerade adds new products to its lineup

    After more than a decade, Coca-Cola’s Powerade brand is stepping up its game with two new products.

  • Coca-Cola (KO) Hits 52-Week High: What's Behind the Rally?
    Zacks

    Coca-Cola (KO) Hits 52-Week High: What's Behind the Rally?

    Coca-Cola's (KO) focus on consumer-centric innovation, solid core brand performance and improved execution in the marketplace bode well.

  • Bloomberg

    Thai Tycoons May Find Tesco Is Closed

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Bangkok’s billionaires don’t usually have to contend with much resistance as they expand. Tesco Plc’s sale of its Southeast Asian supermarkets may be about to change that.The $32 billion British retailer said in December it was considering selling the group’s stores in Thailand and Malaysia, becoming the latest international grocery giant to bow out of Asia. First-round bids for the asset, estimated to be worth between $7 billion and $9 billion, are due this week. Suitors are likely to be drawn from local conglomerates, among them: Dhanin Chearavanont’s CP Group; Central Group, controlled by the Chirathivat family; and beer-and-spirits magnate Charoen Sirivadhanabhakdi's TCC Group.So far, so normal for tycoon-heavy Thailand. Perhaps not. Last month, the Office of Trade Competition Commission, or OTCC, threw a wrench in the gears, signaling before offers even materialized that it would review the deal and could rule against any combination that grabbed too much of the market.Thailand’s government has revamped the antitrust authority since 2017, turning it from a dormant and toothless appendage of the Ministry of Commerce into an impartial agency with an independent workforce. Taking a tough stance could burnish the pro-military administration’s consumer-protection credentials, as it battles a slowing economy and the country’s worst drought in decades.Added to that, this is the the first high-profile, consumer-facing case that the new-look OTCC has handled. It’s also, potentially, one of the largest-ever acquisitions by a Thai group, and among the largest deals in Asia this year. That all but sets up a tussle with some of the most powerful patriarchs in Thai business.In theory, problems arise when a company has a market share of 50% or more. The trouble here, as in every antitrust debate, is deciding what counts as a market.Tesco, under the Tesco Lotus brand, is already Thailand’s biggest supermarket chain with almost 2,000 stores, plus 74 in Malaysia. So, do convenience stores, like CP’s 7-Eleven outlets, count as part of the same market? By the broadest definition, CP touches the vast majority of Thailand’s food chain. What about duty-free, should a last-minute bid come from King Power Group, run by the billionaire Srivaddhanaprabha family that owns Leicester City Football Club? Central Group, meanwhile, has 200 supermarkets, and TCC owns Big C hypermarkets.All of that suggests plenty of wrangling ahead. Worse, Thailand now has a two-stage reporting structure: Unusually by global standards, would-be merger partners may have to report both ahead of and on completion of any deal that creates a dominant player. That means passing the first hurdle doesn’t guarantee a bidder will clear the second.In the end, asset sales may be the most palatable solution, should a big retailer win the contest. Antitrust bosses, still early in their tenure, may be reluctant to irk too many big names. Chinese regulators ruffled plenty of feathers when the Beijing-based Ministry of Commerce vetoed Coca-Cola Co.’s acquisition of a Chinese juice maker in 2009. And Thailand, with its unimpressive economy, badly needs investment.Still, supermarkets are a sensitive and unpredictable area for antitrust authorities, with their focus on safeguarding consumers. Britain’s Competition and Markets Authority, after all, last year stopped J Sainsbury Plc from buying Walmart Inc.’s Asda to create the country’s largest supermarket chain. This could turn into quite a food fight. To contact the author of this story: Clara Ferreira Marques at cferreirama@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Clara Ferreira Marques is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities and environmental, social and governance issues. Previously, she was an associate editor for Reuters Breakingviews, and editor and correspondent for Reuters in Singapore, India, the U.K., Italy and Russia.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Benioff Ocean Initiative and The Coca-Cola Foundation Announce $11 Million in Funding to Clean Up Rivers and Stem Flow of Waste to Oceans

    Nine river clean-up programs across the world have been selected to receive a total of $11 million over the next three years as part of a unique partnership between The Coca-Cola Foundation and the Benioff Ocean Initiative at the University of California Santa Barbara’s Marine Science Institute.

  • Coco-Cola vs. Pepsi: Who Will Win the War Over Hybrid Coffee?
    Zacks

    Coco-Cola vs. Pepsi: Who Will Win the War Over Hybrid Coffee?

    The world's fast move toward cola-coffee drinks has soda giants Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo fighting for a strong foothold in the hybrid coffee space in 2020.

  • 3 Large-Cap Dividend Stocks to Buy Now for Your 2020 Portfolio
    Zacks

    3 Large-Cap Dividend Stocks to Buy Now for Your 2020 Portfolio

    Despite all the positivity, investors should think about adding a few large-cap stocks that pay a solid dividend to help anchor their portfolios in 2020...

  • Bloomberg

    How to Calculate a Bonus That Everybody Loves

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Profits aren’t the be-all and end-all of business, according to the chief executives of JPMorgan Chase & Co., the Coca-Cola Company, General Motors Co. and other members of the Business Roundtable group of American bosses.Their statement last year disavowing the primacy of shareholders and emphasizing that businesses should be run for the benefit of all stakeholders — including customers, employees, communities and suppliers —  left at least one big question unanswered: If the purpose of business is more than just creating value for shareholders, don’t executives need to be incentivized to do more than just increase profit and the share price?So-called “environmental, social and governance” issues — known by the acronym ESG — have become a prime concern for investors who manage trillions of dollars of capital. “Over time, companies and countries that do not respond to stakeholders and address sustainability risks will encounter growing skepticism from the markets, and in turn, a higher cost of capital,” BlackRock Inc.’s boss Larry Fink wrote in his annual letter to CEOs this week.Perhaps it’s time, then, that these topics are given greater emphasis in executive compensation plans. If you think that sounds borderline Marxist, I’ll remind you that Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum — a mountainside schmooze-fest for the 1% that takes place next week — has proposed something very similar.Two recent examples — one from each side of the Atlantic — illustrate why executive pay is ripe for reform.In the U.K. the former boss of homebuilder Persimmon Plc was awarded 85 million pounds ($110 million) for two years work, mainly because generous government home-purchase subsidies helped inflate his company’s sales, dividends and stock price. A damning independent review subsequently exposed the company’s shoddy construction practices.(2)Meanwhile, Boeing Co. executives were richly rewarded for increasing earnings, cash flow and the share price, but that appears to have come at the cost of a rotten corporate culture that browbeat regulators, squeezed suppliers, devalued engineering and hurried an unsafe aircraft into production without adequate pilot training.Plenty of companies already set non-financial strategic targets to align executive compensation with important corporate initiatives and customer satisfaction. Some airline bosses get paid less if planes are consistently late or too much baggage goes missing, for example. In the mining and oil industries it’s common to cut rewards if there are fatal accidents or serious injuries.Elsewhere, though, it’s pretty rare for executives to be offered incentives to achieve ESG targets, such as cutting carbon emissions. About one-fifth of the Stoxx Europe 600 and about one-quarter of S&P500 companies link director compensation to ESG achievements. For the natural resource-heavy FTSE 100 the proportion is about one-third, according to Bloomberg data.Even these pioneers tend to link only a small portion of total pay to ESG goals — typically a chunk of the annual bonus.Instead, the vast majority of more lucrative long-term incentive plans are still based on profit and stock performance, according to a recent FTI Consulting and CGLytics analysis of U.K. and Irish compensation practices. “We anticipate greater pressure from investors on companies to align management incentives with ESG-related metrics,” the authors concluded.Some companies are getting ahead of the curve. At life sciences and material sciences company Royal DSM N.V., 50% of long-term pay incentives are linked to energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions improvements. Oil major Royal Dutch Shell Plc, mining group BHP Group Ltd. and German engineering company Siemens AG have all announced plans to bolster the link between pay and cutting emissions.For some observers, rewarding executives simply for doing the right thing can seem perverse and unnecessary. They argue there's no contradiction between pursuing long-term financial success and being a good corporate citizen, although there are plenty of industries that last pretty well without being virtuous.I’m more sympathetic to the argument that compensation plans are already too complex and opaque. Unless ESG-related pay metrics are clear and quantifiable, it might be difficult to hold executives to account. “Accountability to everyone means accountability to no one,” the Council of Institutional Investors complained last year.Sometimes, though, trade-offs between profits, people and the planet are unavoidable. The climate crisis demands that a company makes investments now that might impair short-term profitability but which will position the business to thrive in the difficult decades ahead. The same goes for paying workers a decent wage, which will enable a thriving middle class. Executives shouldn’t be penalized for doing the right thing, just as they shouldn’t reap rewards for neglecting their non-investor stakeholders such as customers, staff and the public (as was the case with Boeing, Persimmon and Volkswagen AG’s diesel scandal).One way to satisfy those purists who say shareholder value trumps all might be to maintain the financial emphasis of executive incentive plans but apply a sustainability adjustment, as German utility RWE AG, ThyssenKrupp AG and others do. The formula works something like this: So you achieved your profit targets? Good. But did you do it without screwing up the planet or screwing over suppliers? If not, you’re only getting a fraction of your bonus.Of course, if the Business Roundtable’s conversion to stakeholder capitalism is to be more than just good PR, the quantum of executive pay might need rethinking too. Would an executive who treats shareholders, employees and communities equally accept pay that’s more than 100 times the typical worker? Or would they settle for less?(1) In fairness, Persimmon's annual bonus system includes "customer care" and health and safety elements. However, the long term incentive plan which produced this massive payout was based on dividends paid.To contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Coca-Cola (KO) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Coca-Cola (KO) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Coca-Cola (KO) closed at $56, marking a -0.23% move from the previous day.

  • Business Wire

    The Coca-Cola Company Announces Retirement of Ronald W. Allen from Board of Directors

    The Coca-Cola Company today announced that Ronald W. Allen, 78, will not stand for reelection to the board of directors in April.

  • Business Wire

    The Coca-Cola Company Announces Timing of Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2019 Earnings Release

    The Coca-Cola Company today announced it will release fourth quarter and full year 2019 financial results on Jan. 30 before the New York Stock Exchange opens. The release will be followed by an investor conference call at 8:30 a.m. ET to discuss the results.

  • 3 Beverage Makers Upping the Game in 2020 With Hard Seltzers
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    3 Beverage Makers Upping the Game in 2020 With Hard Seltzers

    Beverage giants have stumbled upon a promising range of hard seltzers, satisfying their need for product diversification as well as meeting consumer preferences.

  • Monster Beverage Up More Than 15%: Will the Rally Continue?
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    Monster Beverage Up More Than 15%: Will the Rally Continue?

    Monster Beverage's (MNST) momentum in the energy drinks category should continue to drive performance. Also, its efforts to innovate and launch products are encouraging.

  • Top Analyst Reports for Exxon Mobil, AT&T & Disney
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    Top Analyst Reports for Exxon Mobil, AT&T & Disney

    Top Analyst Reports for Exxon Mobil, AT&T; & Disney

  • Is The Coca-Cola Company's (NYSE:KO) 2.9% Dividend Sustainable?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is The Coca-Cola Company's (NYSE:KO) 2.9% Dividend Sustainable?

    Dividend paying stocks like The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE:KO) tend to be popular with investors, and for good reason...

  • Coca-Cola (KO) Up 19% in a Year: What's Driving the Stock?
    Zacks

    Coca-Cola (KO) Up 19% in a Year: What's Driving the Stock?

    Coca-Cola's (KO) sparkling portfolio gains from momentum in Coke Zero Sugar and other flavors. The third quarter of 2019 marked the eighth straight quarter of double-digit growth for Coke Zero Sugar.