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Lizzo and James Corden Cover Beyoncé's 'Crazy in Love' and Learn a TikTok Dance on Carpool Karaoke

·3-min read

Lizzo may have plenty of hits of her own, but she bows down to Queen Bey just like the rest of the world.

The "About Damn Time" singer, 34, joined James Corden, 43, for a round of Carpool Karaoke on Monday night's episode of The Late Late Show, and together, they took on a cover of the Beyoncé classic "Crazy in Love."

Lizzo even revealed that her beloved flute is named "Sasha Floot" after the star's famous alter ego Sasha Fierce.

"When I was shyer, when I didn't think I was cool, and when I was getting picked on, I would listen to Beyoncé in my bedroom and it would transport me," she told Corden. "I would feel something, I would feel my life is gonna be better. There's hope for me."

The Grammy winner continued, and explained that the 2006 album B'Day became a source of comfort for her as she struggled with her mental health.

Lizzo and James Corden Sing Beyoncé, Do a TikTok Dance
Lizzo and James Corden Sing Beyoncé, Do a TikTok Dance

The Late Late Show with James Corden Lizzo and James Corden

"When I dropped out of college and I was really depressed, I listened to B'Day on repeat and I would just sing B'Day all the time," she recalled. "And I was like, 'I'm gonna be a singer, I'm gonna be a singer.' The way she makes people feel is how I want to make people feel with music. She's been my north star."

Elsewhere in the segment, Lizzo and Corden sang her breakout hit "Good as Hell," "Juice," "Truth Hurts," "Special" and her current single, "About Damn Time," for which they exited the car to learn the song's viral TikTok dance.

RELATED: Lizzo Goes Barbarella Chic in Blue Sequined Bodysuit for 'About Damn Time' Music Video

To help teach Corden, Lizzo recruited a group of dancers, including Jaeden Gomez, who created the dance on TikTok.

The star also revealed the origin of her unique nickname, which was inspired by her real name, Melissa Jefferson.

Lizzo attends the 2022 BET Awards at Microsoft Theater on June 26, 2022 in Los Angeles, California.
Lizzo attends the 2022 BET Awards at Microsoft Theater on June 26, 2022 in Los Angeles, California.

Amy Sussman/Getty Lizzo

"It's a teenage nickname. We did a thing — I don't know if everyone was doing this, but in Houston, you chop the second half of your name and you put an O," she explained. "I was Lisso with two Ss. You're Jameso. You are. And then everybody would be like, Liszo, Liszo, they said it with like a little sway to it, so I changed the Ss to Zs, and the rest is history."

Lizzo is currently gearing up for the release of her fourth album Special, which will drop on July 15.

She recently teamed with Live Nation to pledge $1 million from her upcoming Special Tour to Planned Parenthood and Abortion Funds in light of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and the constitutional right to an abortion.

RELATED: Lizzo, Live Nation Pledge $1 Million to Abortion Nonprofits: 'It Feels Good to Do Good'

"I just want to say that I make music because I wanted to make people feel something and I strongly believe if you can make people feel something, you can make people move something," she said while accepting the Fearlessness Award at the 2nd Hollywood Unlocked Impact Awards on Friday.

"It seems like we're always [in a humanitarian] crisis, like a global pandemic or institutionalized racism or the bans lawmakers put on our bodies. And, it can be a very scary world for someone who's getting a fearless award," she continued.

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