• Wall St soars on hopes of slowing coronavirus deaths
    Reuters Videos

    Wall St soars on hopes of slowing coronavirus deaths

    A stunning rally on Wall Street to start the week amid signs the coronavirus outbreak could be plateauing in some hot spots.... with new deaths and cases in New York, Spain and Italy giving investors hope the virus is peaking. Even with hopes rising, U.S. officials have braced the country for a painful week. Still, optimism prevailed, sparking a 1600-point surge in the Dow, a gain of nearly 8 percent. The S&P 500 rose 7 percent and the Nasdaq was up even more. But a rally of such magnitude, the largest in roughly two weeks, is premature, says Greg Powell. He's CEO, FiPlan Partners. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH): GREG POWELL, CEO, FIPLAN PARTNERS (SAYING): "It's great to see the market react so positively to positive news. At the same time though, we still have a lot to go through over the next two weeks and it's not just the hot spots but throughout the country and so on these strong rallies like this it may be a time if people are selling on the upside and buying on the dips they may want to think about that especially with such a short week." Shares of Carnival surged Monday after Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund revealed it has taken an 8.2 percent stake in the world's biggest cruise ship operator. The stake which was worth about $476 million at the highs of the day, instantly made the Saudi investment vehicle Carnival's second-largest investor, according to Refinitiv Eikon Data. Carnival has had to raise cash and cut costs in an effort to ride out this turmoil. The stock rallied 20 percent. Another stock on the move....Wayfair. The online home furnishing company surged 41 percent. Despite all the doom and gloom out there, the company said it expects to meet or beat is first quarter sales forecast. Why? It is say business is booming as customers flock online to shop with many physical outlets closed. Oil was largely left out of the buying. A meeting scheduled for Monday for OPEC+, which includes fighting producers Saudi Arabia and Russia, was postponed until Thursday. The delay sparking concern that the two sides are not close to securing a global agreement to cut production and stop a crash in prices. Crude oil finished lower in U.S. trade.

  • Monday's big rally is premature: financial advisor
    Reuters Videos

    Monday's big rally is premature: financial advisor

    FiPlan Partners CEO Greg Powell says despite the big rally in stocks on Monday, equities could still head lower because corporate earnings will be weak as the unemployment spikes.

  • Lady Gaga teams up with WHO to support healthcare workers
    Reuters Videos

    Lady Gaga teams up with WHO to support healthcare workers

    Introduced by WHO director general Tedros Adhanom Gheybresus, Lady Gaga commended the efforts of frontline medical staff everywhere and publicized the event, called "One World: Together at Home," which will be shown on multiple television and digital networks around the world on April 18. It will be hosted by late-night television comedians Jimmy Kimmel, Jimmy Fallon and Stephen Colbert. Paul McCartney, Lizzo, Billie Eilish and Elton John will be amongst those to appear and perform during the event. Organizers already have raised $35 million to help support healthcare staff globally with vital equipment, Gaga said. Their goal is to raise funds in advance of the upcoming telecast so viewers can "sit back and enjoy the show you all deserve," she said. Turning his attention back to more usual WHO business, Director General Gheybresus stressed his concern that the wearing of medical masks by the general public could exacerbate the shortage for health workers who are on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • NY's Gov. Cuomo: 'Now is not the time to slack off'
    Reuters Videos

    NY's Gov. Cuomo: 'Now is not the time to slack off'

    "This is an enemy we have underestimated from day one and we have paid the price dearly," Cuomo said during a news conference in Albany, New York on Monday (April 6). He told New Yorkers to continue their social distancing efforts even though data - including hospitalizations and deaths - suggest the state's crisis may be hitting a plateau. Cuomo also told a news briefing that he was extending an order to keep non-essential businesses and schools closed for another two weeks until April 29.

  • Kudlow: Gives relief program an 'A' amid glitches
    Associated Press Videos

    Kudlow: Gives relief program an 'A' amid glitches

    Director of the National Economic Council Larry Kudlow says he would give the Trump administration's relief program an "A" amid glitches that have slowed Americans getting money financially affected by the coronavirus pandemic. (April 6)

  • Dow surges 1,000 points
    Reuters Videos

    Dow surges 1,000 points

    A frantic rally at the market open Wall Street Monday. The Dow shot up more than 1000 points boosted by hopes that the coronavirus outbreak could soon level off in the hardest hit areas. Defensive sectors like utilities and consumer staples led the rally, lifting the blue chip index 5% in early trading. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq jumped more than 4%. Interest-sensitive bank stocks Citigroup, Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase were among the big gainers, tracking the rise in Treasury yields. Separately, JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon wrote in his annual letter to shareholders that he sees a "bad recession" in 2020. Zoom didn't participate in the rally, dropping sharply. Shares of the videoconferencing app fell on security concerns and increased competition from deep-pocketed rivals. Despite the market rebound, analysts warned against saying the steep sell-off was over. During the 2007-2008 financial crisis, the S&P 500 took months to establish a bottom.

  • Japan poised to declare coronavirus emergency
    Reuters Videos

    Japan poised to declare coronavirus emergency

    Japan is poised to declare a state of emergency, while the government prepares a $990 billion stimulus package to soften the economic blow of the coronavirus pandemic. Infections are on the rise in Japan - particularly in Tokyo which has seen an explosive increase in cases. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said an emergency would last about a month, and will give governors authority to call on people to stay at home and businesses to close. But the lockdown measures are unlikely to be as strict as those overseas, where infection rates are higher. Some say Abe has been too slow moving. Despite growing pressure on the government to impose a lockdown, Abe had voiced concern about being too hasty to do so, given the restrictions on movement and businesses it would entail. But medical staff in the city say hospitals have already reached the brink of collapse, due to bed shortages and a sharp rise in cases. Contagion is an enormous risk in dense Tokyo, a city of nearly 14 million people, in a country with one of the world's oldest populations.

  •  "Bad recession" in 2020: JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon
    Reuters Videos

    "Bad recession" in 2020: JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon

    JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon sees a "bad recession" in 2020. In his widely read annual letter to shareholders out Monday, he said the bank's earnings will be down - in his words - "meaningfully...” And he warned the board might consider suspending its dividend, but only if the most dire predictions for the U.S. materialize. For example, if GDP were to plunge by as much as 35% in the second quarter and stay there for the rest of the year. But he said even under that adverse scenario, the bank would be able to boost lending to clients. Dimon pledged the bank would keep supporting small businesses, pointing out that it had extended about $950 million in new loans to small firms. Dimon also said JPMorgan will provide a 90-day grace period for mortgage and auto loan payments and waive associated late fees. And it's giving its staff five additional paid days to help manage personal needs. Shares of JPMorgan rose more than 6% at the market open, whittling away at the stock's nearly 40% decline so far this year.

  • Carmakers in crisis: BMW sales plunge; Peugeot owner raises funds
    Reuters Videos

    Carmakers in crisis: BMW sales plunge; Peugeot owner raises funds

    Little sign of relief Monday (April 6) for Europe's carmakers. BMW says group sales plunged in the first quarter. They were down by just over a fifth as many of it outlets closed. The German firm says 2020 had started with gains. But sales dropped in China from February, and in other key markets from the following month. About 80% of its dealerships in Europe are currently shut due to lockdowns, and about 70% in the U.S. Meanwhile Peugeot-parent PSA says it has secured extra finance to help it endure the crisis. The French firm says it's secured about 3.3 billion dollars in new loans. It didn't say which banks were involved, or if there was any state support. Last month the French government told PSA and rival Renault they were entitled to help including loan guarantees and leeway on bills. Investors welcomed Monday's news, with PSA shares up 6.5% by late morning. It looks like a long road to recovery for the sector though. New figures showed UK new car registrations down 40% on the year in March. They were the weakest numbers for the month in over 20 years. An industry body predicts sales for the full year will be down 25% on 2019.

  • FIFA draws up guidelines to tackle pay-cut complaints
    Reuters Videos

    FIFA draws up guidelines to tackle pay-cut complaints

    World soccer’s governing body FIFA is attempting to step in and take some of the heat off of major clubs and high profile players looking to manage loses and still contribute to healthcare efforts, while no sport is being played. According to an internal document seen by Reuters, FIFA is looking to deal with complaints and appeals over possible wage cuts, which have become a major controversy, particularly in England. The Premier League announced publicly last week that it was looking for its players to give up or defer 30% of their wages. A move that was labelled a “disgrace” on Sunday (April 5) by former England captain Wayne Rooney, adding that decisions on pay cuts should be made on a case-by-case basis. In other countries, such as Germany and Spain, players have accepted temporary reductions in earnings, while Italian champions Juventus agreed to a temporary pay freeze. The internal paper from FIFA notes that such decisions will inevitably differ country to country. Its preferred outcome for the ongoing discussions, including those at the Premier League, is to reach ”appropriate collective agreements.” FIFA’s hope is to balance the need for clubs to protect their assets and business interests, while considering the financial impact of the situation clubs find themselves in with no games to play.

  • Virus leaves Venice's iconic canals eerily empty
    Associated Press Videos

    Virus leaves Venice's iconic canals eerily empty

    Canals in Venice are almost empty as Italy's fight against the coronavirus pandemic continues. Since the country went into lockdown on March 9, hotels, restaurants, cafés and most businesses have been shut. (April 6)

  • Euro zone investor morale hits all-time low
    Reuters Videos

    Euro zone investor morale hits all-time low

    Marc Hueggenberg only needs a laptop and a good internet connection to keep serving cocktails. The Dortmund bar he works in has found an alternative to closing its doors. Clients pay 39 euros for a trial cocktail set. Then they all connect to the same streaming website to learn what to do. But while some businesses may be finding ways to make money during challenging times, that hasn't helped investor morale in the euro zone. It slipped to an all-time low this month. The latest Sentix survey on Monday (April 6) showed the bloc's economy is in deep recession and that the pandemic is "holding the world economy in a stranglehold". It also showed the force of recession to be much stronger in April than in March. In Germany, the sentiment index fell to its lowest since 2009. Separate data on Monday showed orders for German-made goods fell 1.4% in February. Those figures were from before lockdown measures began to affect the country's economy. But a sharp fall in orders from abroad hinted at the likely impact on the export powerhouse's economic prospects.

  • Williams F1 drivers take 20% pay cut, staff put on furlough
    Reuters Videos

    Williams F1 drivers take 20% pay cut, staff put on furlough

    RESENDING WITH COMPLETE SHOTLIST AND SCRIPT VIDEO SHOWS: FILE FOOTAGE OF ROKIT WILLIAMS RACING UNVEILING THEIR LIVERY FOR THE 2019 FORMULA ONE SEASON SHOWS: GROVE, ENGLAND, UK (FILE - FEBRUARY 11, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. CAR BEING UNVEILED 2. ROKiT LIVERY 3. CAR WITH DRIVERS ON STAGE 4. CURRENT WILLIAMS DRIVER GEORGE RUSSELL (LEFT) NEXT TO THEN-TEAM MATE ROBERT KUBICA / CAR 5. RUSSELL 6. VARIOUS OF CAR STORY: Williams drivers, George Russell and Nicholas Latifi, and senior management will be taking a 20% pay cut during the coronavirus crisis, while many of their employees will be temporarily furloughed, the Formula One team said on Monday (April 6). Williams joins fellow British Formula One team McLaren who last week furloughed staff while their drivers and senior management had their wages reduced temporarily for a three-month period to reduce costs with the season on a hiatus. "ROKiT Williams Racing is temporarily furloughing a number of employees as part of a wider range of cost-cutting measures," the team said in a statement. "The furlough period will last until the end of May whilst senior management, and our drivers, have taken a pay cut of 20% effective from April 1." Under the scheme announced by British finance minister Rishi Sunak announced last month, furloughed workers can claim 80% of their wages up to 2,500 pounds ($3,068) per month. "These decisions have not been taken lightly," the statement added. "Our aim is to protect the jobs of our staff... and ensuring they can return to full-time work when the situation allows." The 2020 Formula One season, that was scheduled to begin in Melbourne last month, is yet to get underway after the pandemic cancelled the Australian and Monaco Grands Prix. Races in Bahrain, Vietnam, China, the Netherlands, Spain and Azerbaijan were also postponed, with racing unlikely to start until the European summer at the earliest. (Production: Stefan Haskins)

  • Charities face crisis during UK shutdown as sports fundraising dries up
    Reuters Videos

    Charities face crisis during UK shutdown as sports fundraising dries up

    RESENDING WITH COMPLETE SCRIPT VIDEO SHOWS: FILE FOOTAGE OF PEOPLE TAKING PART IN THE WINGS FOR LIFE MARATHON RACE, STILL PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE 2019 LONDON MARATHON, INTERVIEW WITH HOSPICE UK DIRECTOR OF INCOME GENERATION, CATHERINE BOSWORTH, FILE FOOTAGE OF ELIUD KIPCHOGE AND BRIGID KOSGEI WITH THEIR TROPHIES AFTER WINNING THE 2019 LONDON MARATHON, FILE FOOTAGE OF MO FARAH DOING A PHOTO OPPORTUNITY AHEAD OF THE 2018 LONDON MARATHON SHOWS: MUNICH, GERMANY (FILE - MAY 5, 2019) (MONTUR GMBH - ACCESS ALL) 1. VARIOUS OF RACE PARTICIPANTS AT THE STARTING LINE TAICHUNG, TAIWAN (FILE - MAY 5, 2019) (MONTUR GMBH - ACCESS ALL) 2. PARTICIPANTS SETTING OFF FROM THE STARTING LINE VARIOUS LOCATIONS (FILE - MAY 5, 2019) (MONTUR GMBH - ACCESS ALL) 3. VARIOUS OF RACE PARTICIPANTS RUNNING LONDON, ENGLAND, UNITED KINGDOM (FILE - APRIL 28, 2019) (REUTERS PICTURES - ACCESS ALL) (MUTE) 4. STILL PHOTOGRAPH OF THE START OF THE LONDON MARATHON ELITE MEN'S RACE 5. STILL PHOTOGRAPH OF RUNNERS CROSSING TOWER BRIDGE DURING THE LONDON MARATHON 6. STILL PHOTOGRAPH OF THE FINISH LINE AT THE LONDON MARATHON HERTFORDSHIRE, UNITED KINGDOM (APRIL 3, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 7. (SOUNDBITE) (English) HOSPICE UK DIRECTOR OF INCOME GENERATION, CATHERINE BOSWORTH, SAYING: "I mean we're very pleased that the (London) Marathon has been postponed rather than completely cancelled. We hope that it will still go ahead in October. I suppose that like everybody we'll need to see where we are. Obviously, for Hospice UK and many of our hospice charities that we represent it has a huge impact on our ability to generate funds right now. And of course, at a time when hospices in particular being at the forefront of healthcare and such an important part of our healthcare system need all the funding that we can get. It's quite a stark figure that since the beginning of March we estimate that hospice funding, hospice income is down to the tune of about 70 million pounds in just that short time. So, we really are in a sort of crisis mode." 8. WHITE FLASH 9. (SOUNDBITE) (English) HOSPICE UK DIRECTOR OF INCOME GENERATION, CATHERINE BOSWORTH, SAYING: "The London Marathon is such an important event for so many charities. I think last year it raised around 66 million pounds for charities. So, it's a colossal, significantly important event. For a charity such as Hospice UK last year we generated about half a million pounds 500k from the marathon from our incredible runners and that's out of a total event income of about 600,000 to 700,000 (pounds). So, it's a big, big proportion of what we do and therefore has a huge impact going forward on, you know, affecting our finances generally across the board." 10. WHITE FLASH 11. (SOUNDBITE) (English) HOSPICE UK DIRECTOR OF INCOME GENERATION, CATHERINE BOSWORTH, SAYING: "They (hospices) are having to look at taking advantage of some of the schemes that are out there like the furloughing scheme for non-frontline staff but that then has a knock-on effect on what they're able to do, particularly fundraising. If you haven't got any fundraisers, then you can't do anymore fundraising. But they're just at the moment trying to keep the doors open. We're looking at alternative ways of generating funds for the hospice sector in the meantime. And we hope that we'll be able to do that soon so we can keep our hospices open, keep our hospices as such a key part of the community." 12. WHITE FLASH 13. (SOUNDBITE) (English) HOSPICE UK DIRECTOR OF INCOME GENERATION, CATHERINE BOSWORTH, SAYING: "Many hospices and Hospice UK we've cancelled fundraising events for the foreseeable future but we're still hoping that they will run towards the end of the summer and into the autumn. If that isn't the case it does present really, really difficult challenges for hospices and I fear that yes we're going to be seeing services closing so we're not going to be able to help all the people that need it at a time when demand is going to be increasing quite dramatically. So yes, it's a huge problem in the short term, we hope that as many hospices as we can help to stay open, to continue to help people in their communities will be able to for the foreseeable future. But there will come a point when funds are just going to run out and then I fear we will start to see services severely impacted." VARIOUS LOCATIONS (MAY 5, 2019) (MONTUR GMBH - ACCESS ALL) 14. VARIOUS OF RACE PARTICIPANTS RUNNING AND WALKING LONDON, ENGLAND, UNITED KINGDOM (FILE - APRIL 29, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 15. VARIOUS OF LONDON MARATHON MEN'S WINNER ELIUD KIPCHOGE POSING FOR THE CAMERAS 16. WINNER OF THE WOMEN'S MARATHON, BRIGID KOSGEI WITH HER TROPHY 17. PHOTOGRAPHERS 18. ELIUD KIPCHOGE AND BRIGID KOSGEI WITH TROPHY LONDON, ENGLAND, UNITED KINGDOM (FILE - APRIL 17, 2018) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 19. MO FARAH JOGGING ALONG RIVER THAMES IN FRONT OF TOWER BRIDGE 20. VARIOUS OF FARAH POSING FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS 21. CLOSE OF FARAH NAME BIB 22. FARAH POSING FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS 23. PHOTOGRAPHERS TAKING PHOTOS 24. VARIOUS OF FARAH POSING FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS STORY: The postponement of major sporting events during the coronavirus pandemic has left some British charities concerned about their survival and being able to deliver services to vulnerable people. The London Marathon last year raised over 66 million pounds ($81.21 million) for more than 750 charities but its postponement from April 26 to Oct. 4 has left charities facing a shortage of funds at a time when services are under pressure. The postponement of other major sporting events such as the Premier League is also hitting organisations hard at a time when charity shops have been forced to close during the lockdown to fight the virus, which has infected 47,806 people and killed 4,934 in the United Kingdom. The concern in the charity sector is widespread, with 50% of respondents to a survey from the Directory of Social Change reporting that their organisations would go bust within six months without additional help. Seventy percent said they would go bust by the end of the year without financial assistance if the lockdown continues. Catherine Bosworth, director of income generation for Hospice UK, told Reuters the organisation earns around 500,000 pounds each year from the London Marathon, over 70% of its annual income from fundraising. She added that hospices had reported a dip in income worth 70 million pounds since the start of March and many would have to start cutting services if fundraising events continued to be cancelled. "We really are in crisis mode," she said. "If events cannot run later in the summer, I fear we'll see services closing so we won't be able to help all the people who need it at a time that demand is increasing quite dramatically. There will come a point when funds are just going to run out." (Production: Richard Martin, Tim Hart)

  • Hong Kong piano teacher offers lessons on a truck
    Reuters Videos

    Hong Kong piano teacher offers lessons on a truck

    Welcome to the 'piano truck' where a music teacher is offering mobile lessons Location: Hong Kong on student's doorsteps despite schools being shut (SOUNDBITE) (Cantonese) 27-YEAR-OLD EVAN KAM, CURRICULUM OFFICER AT MING'S PIANO, SAYING: ''We are diligent in cleaning the truck. Every time you step on it, we repeat certain steps. For example, we have to clean the piano, because there might be dust and germs while driving, or because of the last student who used the piano. We must ensure that the surface of the piano is clean. When the student arrives I will provide hand sanitizer for them to apply and clean their hands.'' Kam's music school lost two-thirds of its business but the piano truck has brought back students and offers parents a break (SOUNDBITE) (Cantonese) SOPHIA'S MOTHER, WENDY YEUNG, SAYING: "Parents have been spending every minute with our children. It's not good to nag them all the time but we also don't know what to do with them. I was also afraid to let them out. I feel very depressed myself, not to mention my children. I think my kids also feel depressed."

  • Protesters ransack makeshift coronavirus hospital
    Reuters Videos

    Protesters ransack makeshift coronavirus hospital

    Protesters tore down a makeshift COVID-19 hospital in Ivory Coast's capital Abidjan on Sunday (April 6) night. To the banging of pots and pans, and cries of "we don't want it", the angry residents of Yopougon dismantled the partially built structure. The person filming the scene is saying they are opposed to the facility, for treating those with the new coronavirus, being built quote "right in the middle of the Ivorian population". Market stalls on a road leading to the structure were also set ablaze. Ivory Coast had more than 260 cases of COVID-19 as of Monday (April 6) morning and authorities have been building makeshift hospitals across the capital.

  • Bayern Munich train while practising social distancing
    Reuters Videos

    Bayern Munich train while practising social distancing

    VIDEO SHOWS: BAYERN MUNICH TRAINING DURING NATION-WIDE CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN IN GERMANY RESENDING WITH COMPLETE SCRIPT SHOWS: MUNICH, GERMANY (APRIL 6, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. VARIOUS OF BAYERN MUNICH PLAYERS AT TRAINING 2. GOALKEEPER MANUEL NEUER AT TRAINING 3. FORWARD THOMAS MUELLER SHOOTING 4. VARIOUS OF SIGN OUTSIDE TRAINING PITCH TELLING PEOPLE TO KEEP A MANDATORY 1,5 METER DISTANCE IMPOSED BY GOVERNMENT 5. FORWARD KINGSLEY COMAN AT TRAINING 6. PLAYERS TRAINING 7. PLAYERS STRETCHING 8. PLAYERS RUNNING 9. ASSISTANT COACHES KEEPING DISTANCE 10. VARIOUS OF PLAYERS AT TRAINING 11. VARIOUS OF NEUER TRAINING 12. VARIOUS OF MEDIA 13. EXTERIOR OF CLUB HEADQUARTERS 14. CLUB LOGO READING (German) “FC BAYERN MUNICH” 15. EXTERIOR OF HEADQUARTERS STORY: Bayern Munich returned to team training on Monday (April 6) as well as other Bundesliga clubs, with players split in small groups or pairs and kept at a safe distance amid strict measures to contain the spread of the coronavirus. German soccer has been suspended for almost a month and the German Football League (DFL) has said the ban will remain in place for the top divisions at least until April 30. The Bavarians trained in groups of five but without any contact, just like Borussia Moenchengladbach, VfL Wolfsburg and others. Germany has seen the number of infected people rise above 100,000 this weekend and nearly 1,600 have died after testing positive for the virus that has forced the country into lockdown. Despite the training resumption the DFL made it clear last week it was not known if or when the season would resume, and the stop in play has also had major financial effects on clubs. (Production: Ayhan Uyanik and Elena Gyldenkerne)

  • Stocks jump on virus slowdown hopes, but oil slips on oversupply
    Reuters Videos

    Stocks jump on virus slowdown hopes, but oil slips on oversupply

    Equity investors took solace on Monday (April 6) as the death toll from Covid-19 slowed across major European nations including France and Italy. The benchmark STOXX 600 index was up nearly 3 percent in early deals. Italian and French bourses jumped 3.5% and 3.4%, respectively. With business activity in the region grinding to a halt, companies have been forced to suspend dividends. British aero-engine maker Rolls-Royce is one of the latest. It scrapped its final dividend on Monday, but its shares jumped over 10% after it said it had secured an additional $1.8 billion in reserves to weather a prolonged downturn. London's FTSE 100 was up nearly 3 percent in morning trade, but was underperforming its European peers on news that British Prime Minister Boris Johnson was admitted to hospital 10 days after testing positive for the virus. In Asia, Japan's Nikkei added over 4%, while South Korea's KOSPI and Hong Kong's Hang Seng both jumped higher. Markets in mainland China were closed for a public holiday. There were worries that the number of new cases jumped in China on Sunday (April 5) while the number of asymptomatic cases surged too as Beijing struggles to extinguish the outbreak. In commodity markets, Brent crude fell after Saudi Arabia and Russia postponed their meeting, even as the virus pandemic pummels demand.

  • Samsung's solid chip sales unlikely to help profits
    Reuters Videos

    Samsung's solid chip sales unlikely to help profits

    The global shift to working from home is boosting demand for Samsung's memory chips as laptop makers and data centers snap them up. But in guidance set to release Tuesday (April 7), the South Korean tech giant's first-quarter profits are still likely to remain flat. That's because sales of the company's smartphones and other consumer electronics are falling, and analysts tell Reuters that longer-term, the bump in chip sales could be at risk, too. The shutdown of factories and retail stores worldwide is hitting the company on two fronts and unnerving investors. Samsung's shares have slumped 15% so far this year but outperformed the wider market's fall of 22%. Prospects for the company's flagship Galaxy S20 premium smartphones, launched just over a month ago, are looking dim. An official at a local carrier in South Korea told Reuters the 5G enabled phones are already selling at a third of their launch price. One brokerage - Hanwha Investment & Securities - estimates Samsung's smartphone sales in the first quarter fell 17% from just a year ago. Last year Samsung's full-year earnings were halved by their smartphone and chip businesses' slump in profits. Smartphone rival Apple has also rolled back its profit forecast over production and retail shutdowns in China.

  • Coronavirus redraws battle lines on airline emissions
    Reuters Videos

    Coronavirus redraws battle lines on airline emissions

    Crippled European airlines have demanded relief from environmental taxes - pitting immediate survival against long-term emission goals. The tax tussle poses an important question: Should bailouts come before climate objectives? Airlines have been forced to suspend flights, lay off thousands of staff, and seek government aid to avoid collapse. The head of the International Air Transport Association said it wasn’t wise to increase taxation on a structurally and financially weak sector. (SOUNDBITE) (English) THE INTERNATIONAL AIR TRANSPORT ASSOCIATION (IATA) DIRECTOR GENERAL AND CEO, ALEXANDRE DE JUNIAC, SAYING: "We are facing an unprecedented crisis at a level and order of magnitude that is unknown (…) In two or three months, more than half of the airlines should be totally out of cash. It is basically a cash crisis - no revenues and cost sales are still running.” The shutdown is likely to result in a full-year decline in emissions. Experts say that could dilute public support for environmental change. Andrew Murphy works for campaign group Transport and Environment. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ANDREW MURPHY, TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT, SAYING: “We need big action by governments and industry to make sure this isn't just a temporary fall in emissions because we need more than a temporary fall in emissions. We need to start bringing emissions down permanently.” Green advocates fear climate action may lose momentum - as it did after the 2008 financial crisis. They're calling for aid to come with green strings attached. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ANDREW MURPHY, TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENT, SAYING: “If airlines do get public money, we need to see a big change in how they approach climate change, because for decades now their emissions have grown every year (…) for example, airlines having to pay tax on the jet fuel. They're now currently totally exempt from jet fuel tax or airlines having to use alternative fuels, alternative to jet fuel. So, you know, we need some big commitments from the airlines if they're going get the public support.”

  • Leitch fears Japan failing to build on World Cup heroics
    Reuters Videos

    Leitch fears Japan failing to build on World Cup heroics

    RESENDING WITH COMPLETE SCRIPT VIDEO SHOWS: MICHAEL LEITCH AT COFFEE SHOP / LEITCH SPEAKING ABOUT FUTURE OF JAPANESE RUGBY, SUPER RUGBY AND POSSIBLY BECOMING JRFU CEO ONE DAY / FILE FOOTAGE OF LEITCH DURING RUGBY WORLD CUP AND DURING RUGBY WORLD CUP PARADE SHOWS: TOKYO, JAPAN (RECENT - MARCH 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. VARIOUS OF EXTERIOR OF JAPAN RUGBY UNION CAPTAIN, MICHAEL LEITCH'S COFFEE SHOP 2. VARIOUS OF LEITCH BEFORE INTERVIEW 3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) JAPAN RUGBY UNION CAPTAIN, MICHAEL LEITCH, SAYING: "For the national team, to get to that point (at the World Cup) took a lot of hard work, four years of hard work, and we did that for a short period. To do it back-to-back, back-to-back would be a very difficult process. If that was going to happen you would have to change the way Top League operates and have certain times when the national team can get together and train. But, at the moment, it is a bit… I wouldn't say disorganised… but we are not focussing on the Japanese team at the moment." 4. LEITCH DURING INTERVIEW 5. (SOUNDBITE) (English) JAPAN RUGBY UNION CAPTAIN, MICHAEL LEITCH, SAYING: "If we start losing those test matches then we could get back to what we were at, only playing against tier two countries and playing against each other. There is a lot of pressure on us to keep playing well and to be competitive against those top tier one countries." TOKYO, JAPAN (FILE - SEPTEMBER 18, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 6. JAPAN TEAM STRETCHING DURING GYM SESSION 7. WINGER KENKI FUKUOKA STRETCHING 8. LEITCH STRETCHING TOKYO, JAPAN (RECENT - MARCH 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 9. (SOUNDBITE) (English) JAPAN RUGBY UNION CAPTAIN, MICHAEL LEITCH, SPEAKING ABOUT THE SUNWOLVES, SAYING: "It is very disappointing. That was such a great tool for us to develop good Japanese players and for us to not be a part of that next year… I'm not sure how else we are going to develop good Japanese players unless they start playing for Japan but we need to get them to the point where they can compete for Japan." FUKUROI CITY, JAPAN (FILE - SEPTEMBER 27, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 10. JAPAN TEAM ARRIVING FOR TRAINING BEFORE MATCH AGAINST IRELAND 11. LEITCH WALKING 12. HEAD COACH JAMIE JOSEPH LOOKING ON 13. JAPAN TEAM TRAINING TOKYO, JAPAN (RECENT - MARCH 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 14. (SOUNDBITE) (English) JAPAN RUGBY UNION CAPTAIN, MICHAEL LEITCH, SAYING: "For me personally, I don't want to see Japanese rugby turned into a league that is no Japanese players, or in the national team with no Japanese players, so there needs to be a way where we promote Japanese rugby players and I think that is the next step we need to take." TOKYO, JAPAN (FILE - DECEMBER 11, 2019) (FOREIGN POOL - ACCESS ALL) 15. PARADE FOR JAPANESE RUGBY TEAM UNDERWAY 16. LEITCH WALKING WITH TEAM MEMBERS AND WAVING TO CROWD 17. PARADE FOR JAPANESE RUGBY TEAM UNDERWAY 18. LEITCH WAVING 19. FANS WAVING AND TAKING PHOTOGRAPHS WITH SMARTPHONES 20. LEITCH AND OTHER PLAYERS WAVING TO FANS AND WALKING BY TOKYO, JAPAN (RECENT - MARCH 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 21. (SOUNDBITE) (English) JAPAN RUGBY UNION CAPTAIN, MICHAEL LEITCH, SAYING: "After the World Cup, I had six weeks in New Zealand so I had a good time to think about what I want to do. But after spending six weeks in New Zealand - I live in a town with maybe 3,000 people - I got thinking I can't retire from rugby, come back here and live and do nothing. So, the next thing I was thinking about was maybe getting into some kind of administration job, maybe become the CEO of Japanese rugby one day. One day. That would be an interesting job because I have genuine passion for Japanese rugby and I can use my English and my Japanese to communicate with different unions. And obviously with having that rugby background too, I need to now get a business background so hopefully this coffee shop starts to make money. I could be the CEO of Japanese rugby one day." 22. LEITCH DURING INTERVIEW STORY: Japan's fairytale run to the Rugby World Cup quarter-finals was a highlight of last year's tournament but with the afterglow all but gone and a coronavirus pandemic forcing the world of sports to a standstill, captain Michael Leitch fears not enough is being done to secure the Brave Blossoms a place at the game's top table. "To get to that point (at the World Cup) took a lot of hard work, four years of hard work, and we did that for a short period," Leitch told Reuters. "But at the moment, it is a bit ... I wouldn't say disorganised ... but we are not focusing on the Japanese team at the moment." In an unprecedented move last year, the corporations that own Japan's domestic clubs allowed players to train with the national team for nine months ahead of the World Cup. Since then, however, the Top League had returned to normal, meaning the players would only be available to Japan for short periods before test matches. Japan was also dealt a major blow its national rugby campaign after losing its Super Rugby side, the Sunwolves, which Leitch described as a "great tool for us to develop great Japanese players". For Leitch, who was born in New Zealand and moved to Japan when he was 15, any new structure must prioritize the development of young Japanese talent. "For me personally, I don't want to see Japanese rugby turned into a league that is no Japanese players, or in the national team with no Japanese players, so there needs to be a way where we promote Japanese rugby players and I think that is the next step we need to take." As he does on the pitch, Leitch is prepared to back up his words with action, and the future of rugby in his adopted nation is at the forefront of his thinking. "After the World Cup, I had six weeks in New Zealand," said the 31-year-old loose forward. "I got thinking, 'I can't retire from rugby, come back here, live and do nothing'. I was thinking about getting into some kind of administration job. Maybe become the CEO of Japanese rugby one day." (Production: Jack Tarrant)

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    SHOWS: MANAGUA, NICARAGUA (APRIL 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 1. FANS WATCHING SOCCER GAME ON SCREEN ESTELI, NICARAGUA (RECENT) (DEPORTIVO LAS SABANAS HANDOUT - ACCESS ALL) 2. VARIOUS OF GAME BETWEEN DEPORTIVO LAS SABANAS VS REAL ESTELI MANAGUA, NICARAGUA (APRIL 2, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 3. INTERVIEW VIA SKYPE WITH CARLOS MOSQUERA, A COLOMBIAN GOALKEEPER WITH DEPORTIVO LAS SABANAS BY REUTERS JOURNALIST ANDREW DOWNIE MANAGUA, NICARAGUA (APRIL 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 4. VARIOUS OF RESIDENTS IN CITY WEARING FACE MASKS DIRIAMBA, NICARAGUA (APRIL 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 5. SECRETARY GENERAL OF THE NICARAGUAN FOOTBALL FEDERATION, JOSE MARIA BERMUDEZ KICKING A FOOTBALL 6. (SOUNDBITE) (Spanish) SECRETARY GENERAL OF THE NICARAGUAN FOOTBALL FEDERATION, JOSE MARIA BERMUDEZ, SAYING: "What we received and it was a request from a broadcast company in Sweden, who showed interest, in showing logically live league games, for the same thing. I think here, nationwide, we won't achieve the same thing because it's accessible but soccer has been halted all over the world. Soccer is the number 1 sport around the world so people who are fans want to watch football. I think that's part of the reasons why people have turned their attention over here." MANAGUA, NICARAGUA (APRIL 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 7. VARIOUS OF FANS WATCHING SOCCER GAME ON SCREEN 8. (SOUNDBITE) (Spanish) SOCCER FAN, ERICK VANEGAS, SAYING: ''I think it's a bad decision on behalf of the directors and the league because they are risking the health of the players and their families because we have seen in other countries - in Italy, Spain - famous players who have tested positive for coronavirus.'' DIRIAMBA, NICARAGUA (APRIL 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 9. BERMUDEZ, DURING INTERVIEW 10. (SOUNDBITE) (Spanish) SECRETARY GENERAL OF THE NICARAGUAN FOOTBALL FEDERATION, JOSE MARIA BERMUDEZ, SAYING: "The games are being played behind closed doors. That is one of the measures. The contagion between players, all the players are following the protocols of hygiene, with soap, liquids, antibacterial gel, a series of things. Also clubs are checking their players during training sessions and they have not found or seen players with symptoms." ESTELI, NICARAGUA (RECENT) (DEPORTIVO LAS SABANAS HANDOUT - ACCESS ALL) 11. VARIOUS OF GAME BETWEEN DEPORTIVO LAS SABANAS VS REAL ESTELI MANAGUA, NICARAGUA (APRIL 4, 2020) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL) 12. FANS WATCHING SOCCER GAME ON SCREEN STORY: Football in Nicaragua is enjoying a surge in popularity as one of the few national leagues where games are still ongoing but players in action there are concerned about the spread of the new coronavirus and say fear has changed the way they play. "We try to avoid touching other players," Carlos Mosquera, goalkeeper with Deportivo Las Sabanas, told Reuters. "The fear of what is happening in the world is always present. Mentally, you're not focused on the game, you are always thinking that opponents may have the disease." The Primera Liga de Nicaragua is one of only four leagues believed to have survived the coronavirus lockdown, along with those in Belarus, Burundi and Tajikistan. Games in the Central American nation are being played behind closed doors but are being broadcast locally on television or live on Facebook. The refusal to shut down has drawn global attention to football in a nation that has long preferred baseball, a sport that is also resisting a lockdown in Nicaragua. The secretary general of the Nicaraguan Football Federation, Jose Maria Bermudez, said fans from around the world are now tuning in to watch games and bet on them. Bermudez also said with live sport almost entirely absent from the world's TV screens, at least one foreign company had been in touch with the local rights holder, state-run Canal 6, asking to broadcast Nicaraguan games live. That could result in a windfall for the unheralded league. Bermudez stressed that the 10-team league has not decided to complete their season, merely "to keep playing for as long as the situation permits." There are five regular season matches to play before the top four teams go into a semi-final and final round play-off expected to begin in late April. He pointed out that Nicaragua has recorded only a handful of cases of the new coronavirus and no deaths so far. The number of confirmed cases had risen to five by Friday. Players said they were not consulted about the decision to keep playing, which was taken after a meeting between the league and club owners, many of whom get financial support from the government of Nicaragua's authoritarian president Daniel Ortega. Ortega has insisted Nicaragua is taking the most sensible approach to dealing with the pandemic. Critics say he wants to show the world that life in Nicaragua continues as normal. Washington imposed sanctions on Nicaragua following a crackdown on opposition protests in 2018. Some members of the European Union have accused Ortega of jailing and torturing political prisoners and banning human rights groups and media outlets, something the government denies. Some players lined up for games this week wearing masks and gloves. Players at Deportivo Las Sabanas club told Reuters they needed to keep playing to support their families, and half-jokingly said the newfound interest in Nicaraguan football could help win them a transfer to a bigger club. (Production: Arnaldo Arita, Manuel Carrillo)