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Gen Z Rep.-Elect Maxwell Frost Was Denied a D.C. Apartment: 'Ran Up a Lot of Debt Running for Congress'

US House of Representatives member-elect Maxwell Frost (C), Democrat of Florida, arrives for a group photo with member-elect Harriet Hageman (L), Republican of Wyoming, outside of the US Capitol in Washington, DC on November 15, 2022.
US House of Representatives member-elect Maxwell Frost (C), Democrat of Florida, arrives for a group photo with member-elect Harriet Hageman (L), Republican of Wyoming, outside of the US Capitol in Washington, DC on November 15, 2022.

MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty

Incoming U.S. Rep. Maxwell Alejandro Frost, a 25-year-old activist and former Uber driver who will be the youngest member of Congress when he is sworn in next month, is already facing challenges in his new role — namely, how to find an apartment when you just ended a costly congressional campaign and aren't yet earning a salary.

In a Twitter thread posted Thursday, Frost detailed his quest to find an apartment in the U.S. capital, saying he was denied due to bad credit.

"Just applied to an apartment in DC where I told the guy that my credit was really bad. He said I'd be fine," Frost wrote. "Got denied, lost the apartment, and the application fee. This ain't meant for people who don't already have money."

RELATED: From Uber Driver to House Frontrunner, Maxwell Frost Is Committed to Giving Gen Z a Seat at the Table

In later tweets, Frost shared that his bad credit was largely the result of his congressional run, writing: "For those asking, I have bad credit cause I ran up a lot of debt running for Congress for a year and a half. Didn't make enough money from Uber itself to pay for my living."

"It isn't magic that we won our very difficult race," Frost continued. "For that primary, I quit my full time job cause I knew that to win at 25 yrs old, I'd need to be a full time candidate. 7 days a week, 10-12 hours a day. It's not sustainable or right but it's what we had to do."

But as Frost noted in further tweets, campaign law dictates that candidates cannot legally give themselves a stipend until the end of their campaigns — which means that unless they are independently wealthy to begin with, most politicians find themselves losing money early on.

"As a candidate, you can't give yourself a stipend or anything till the very end of your campaign. So most of the run, you have no $ coming in unless you work a second job," Frost wrote.

RELATED: Maxwell Alejandro Frost Elected as First Gen Z Member of Congress

Democratic U.S. Representative-elect Maxwell Frost of Florida arrives at the Hyatt Regency on November 13, 2022 in Washington, DC. Newly elected members of the House arrived in the capital today for orientation.
Democratic U.S. Representative-elect Maxwell Frost of Florida arrives at the Hyatt Regency on November 13, 2022 in Washington, DC. Newly elected members of the House arrived in the capital today for orientation.

Nathan Howard/Getty

As Frost noted, New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez found herself faced with a similar dilemma after being elected in 2018.

After giving up her job as a bartender to focus on her campaign, Ocasio-Cortez found herself at a crossroads upon winning her election. In an interview with The New York Times, she noted that she couldn't really "take a salary" in the interim period after being elected but before taking office.

"I have three months without a salary before I'm a member of Congress," Ocasio-Cortez told the Times. "So, how do I get an apartment? Those little things are very real."

RELATED: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Says She Can't Afford to Move to D.C. Without a Congressional Salary

Four years later, the problem persists for Frost, who became the first member of Generation Z to be elected to Congress, after winning the Democratic nomination for the House in Florida's 10th Congressional District in August.

Speaking to PEOPLE ahead of the November general election, Frost said he had stopped driving for Uber after winning his primary, with the campaign taking up all of his time.

"I just learned I wouldn't get my paycheck until a month after I win the general election," Frost told PEOPLE.

"So I might have to drive in D.C.," he added. "I need to pay the rent."

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In his Twitter thread Thursday, Frost noted the dilemma, but acknowledged his finances would soon get a boost from his congressional salary.

"I also recognize that I'm speaking from a point of privilege cause in 2 years time, my credit will be okay because of my new salary that starts next year," Frost wrote, adding: "We have to do better for the whole country."