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Inside Edition 's Deborah Norville Says She Once Suffered a Miscarriage: 'I've Never Talked About That'

·5-min read
Inside Edition 's Deborah Norville Says She Once Suffered a Miscarriage: 'I've Never Talked About That'

Deborah Norville is opening up about previously suffering a miscarriage years ago.

While walking the red carpet of the 49th annual Daytime Emmy Awards on Friday evening, the Inside Edition anchor, 63, chatted with PEOPLE about the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade. Norville detailed how she now worries for pregnant people who could face obstacles should they suffer a miscarriage as well, given restrictions that could come about in certain states tied to the landmark ruling.

"Well, the reality is at this moment, depending on where you are in America, if you have a miscarriage, you may not be able to receive the medical treatment you need to avoid death," she said. "I lost a child, [but] I live in New York and I was able to go to the hospital and do what needed to be done."

"On a personal level, I realized I could have died 24 years ago when I needed to have that medical procedure. I didn't choose to have it. I didn't choose to have my child die in utero, but that's what happened. And many women have miscarriages in this country," Norville continued. "And unfortunately, when you have the miscarriage, you generally have to have the D&C, [the Dilation and Curettage surgical procedure], and the [Supreme Court ruling] would not make that possible for a lot of people."

Noting that her miscarriage is something that she has "never talked about," the television journalist said, "It just hit me today when [the Roe v. Wade decision] happened," adding, "I happily was able to become pregnant later. And I'd never really thought that was something that anybody would ever not be able to avail themselves of."

RELATED: 41 Celebrities Who Have Shared Their Miscarriage Stories, in the Hopes of Helping Others

PASADENA, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 24: Deborah Norville attends the 49th Daytime Emmy Awards at Pasadena Convention Center on June 24, 2022 in Pasadena, California. (Photo by Amy Sussman/Getty Images)
PASADENA, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 24: Deborah Norville attends the 49th Daytime Emmy Awards at Pasadena Convention Center on June 24, 2022 in Pasadena, California. (Photo by Amy Sussman/Getty Images)

Amy Sussman/Getty

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Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court decision of 1973 that granted women the right to an abortion in every state, was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday.

The 6-to-3 ruling reverses nearly 50 years of legal precedent and will completely change the landscape of women's reproductive rights by giving individual states the power to decide whether to allow the procedure. It is estimated that nearly half the country will enact near-total bans in the coming months.

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JUNE 13: Deborah Norville attends the 2022 Apollo Theater Spring Benefit at The Apollo Theater on June 13, 2022 in New York City. (Photo by Shahar Azran/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JUNE 13: Deborah Norville attends the 2022 Apollo Theater Spring Benefit at The Apollo Theater on June 13, 2022 in New York City. (Photo by Shahar Azran/Getty Images)

Shahar Azran/Getty

Continuing to speak with PEOPLE, Norville — who is a mom to three adult children — spoke about her role as a journalist and how she navigates telling stories with accuracy, without sharing her personal opinion on the subjects she is reporting.

"We are just the facts," she said. "We come at it with the idea that everything we say, you have to be able to prove."

"I think that's generally a good way to go through life. It's an excellent way to go through producing a television program if you want to stay on the air," continued Norville — who attended the 2022 Daytime Emmys on behalf of Inside Edition, which was nominated in the outstanding entertainment news series category.

RELATED VIDEO: Roe v. Wade Overturned by SCOTUS: 'We Can Only Talk About What Roe v. Wade Protected, Past Tense'

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Norville also spoke with PEOPLE about her illustrious news career, detailing that while she "loved doing the Today show," in the 1990s, "It didn't end the way I would've wished it to."

"And when my career ended then, nobody thought I'd be back. So the fact that I'm back that you're talking to me and you want to talk to me is I consider that maybe my greatest achievement," she continued.

Norville also said that she "loved the show because I love the variety. I didn't mind the hours."

"I love the fact that my very first interview I ever did on the Today show was with the Soviet nuclear arms control negotiator, and it was a live hookup from Geneva, and I thought, 'Oh my God, if I mess this up, I actually could start a war. This is serious stuff,' " she added. "And then the next minute, you'd be interviewing somebody who'd written a cookbook."

THE TODAY SHOW -- Pictured: (l-r) co-host Deborah Norville, co-host Bryant Gumbel (Photo by NBC NewsWire/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images via Getty Images)
THE TODAY SHOW -- Pictured: (l-r) co-host Deborah Norville, co-host Bryant Gumbel (Photo by NBC NewsWire/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images via Getty Images)

NBC NewsWire/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty

Norville also recalled a moment "three days in" her position when she told executive producer Steve Friedman on the morning television program, "'I can't do this anymore. You have to have somebody to do the rest of the week.' "

"Nobody ever says, I don't want to do the Today show," she continued, before noting that Friedman had asked her: "Have you gone mad? What's wrong with you?"

"I said, 'Steve, I'm exhausted. I'm staying up all night long, reading everything about all these interviews I have to do,' " she continued. "I said, 'You send a limousine with a packet of information to my house at nine o'clock. I figure if it's important enough to get a chauffeured limousine, it's important enough for me to read.' "

Friedman, Norville detailed, explained to her, however, that she had to pick one of several topics "that you're not really comfortable with, that you don't have a good feel for" and "study that one."

Calling the notice from Friedman a "game-changer," Norville added of her time on Today, "I would do that again in a minute."

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