New Zealand markets close in 2 hours 43 minutes
  • NZX 50

    10,988.98
    -211.06 (-1.88%)
     
  • NZD/USD

    0.5730
    -0.0001 (-0.02%)
     
  • NZD/EUR

    0.5827
    -0.0005 (-0.08%)
     
  • ALL ORDS

    6,711.40
    -49.20 (-0.73%)
     
  • ASX 200

    6,514.10
    -40.90 (-0.62%)
     
  • OIL

    81.40
    +0.17 (+0.21%)
     
  • GOLD

    1,671.70
    +3.10 (+0.19%)
     
  • NASDAQ

    11,164.78
    -329.05 (-2.86%)
     
  • FTSE

    6,881.59
    -123.80 (-1.77%)
     
  • Dow Jones

    29,225.61
    -458.13 (-1.54%)
     
  • DAX

    11,975.55
    -207.73 (-1.71%)
     
  • Hang Seng

    17,165.87
    0.00 (0.00%)
     
  • NIKKEI 225

    26,060.21
    -361.84 (-1.37%)
     
  • NZD/JPY

    82.7980
    +0.0510 (+0.06%)
     

Lady Gaga tells Americans to 'speak up' in fight for abortion rights

·3-min read


Lady Gaga has urged Americans to speak up and vowed to continue fighting against the country's anti-abortion ruling.
The pop star has been an outspoken critic of the supreme court overturning of Roe v. Wade - the landmark ruling which gave women the constitutional right to a termination - and she paused her concert in Washington D.C. on Monday night (08.08.22) to dedicate her track 'Edge of Glory' to all those affected.
She said: "I would like to dedicate this song to every woman in America. For every woman who now has to worry about her body if she gets pregnant.
"I pray that this country will speak up, that we will stick together, and that we will not stop until it's right!
You just got to keep believing it's gonna be okay."
At the end of the track, she added: "I didn't mean to be a downer, but there's some s**t that's more important than show business."
Lady Gaga previously opened up about her own personal struggle , revealing she fell pregnant after being sexually assaulted by a music producer when she was just 19 years old.
She admitted she felt she was "living this big lie" by not speaking about her ordeal, so when she did open up, she felt much more "comfortable". She told Deadline: "I think that for me it was just a healing process because I’m in the public eye often. At the time when I first started to come out of things that I was going through, I was in the public eye very frequently and followed all the time. "I really felt like I was living this big lie by not sharing what I was experiencing. And it actually helped me to share my life experiences because then my fans - or people that were following me, people that were discovering me - they knew more of the human side of me. I just felt more comfortable in the world. It’s like living in your truth ...
"I think when you live in your values and your truth, it can help you. In my particular existence it helps me to not feel like an imposter, but rather to know that I’m uniquely and truly myself, wounds and all."
Speaking in the first episode of Oprah Winfrey and Prince Harry‘s Apple TV+ series, 'The Me You Can’t See', she previously said of her assault: “I was 19 years old, and I was working in the business, and a producer said to me, ‘Take your clothes off.' “And I said no. And I left, and they told me they were going to burn all of my music. And they didn’t stop. They didn’t stop asking me, and I just froze and I - I don’t even remember. "And I will not say his name. I understand this Me Too movement, and I understand people feel real comfortable with this, and I do not. I do not ever want to face that person again.” The 'Poker Face' hitmaker then revealed that years later, a doctor advised her to see a psychiatrist for her chronic pain, leading to her diagnosis of PTSD stemming from the ordeal.