Russia-Ukraine, Mississippi tornadoes, Honduras teams up with CCP: This week in politics

·2-min read

Geopolitics returns to the top of Congress' mind this week as new reports emerge about escalating tensions between Russia and Ukraine.

Meanwhile, Honduras has elected to partner with the Chinese Communist Party, ending its relationship with Taiwan.

Over in the U.S., residents of the state of Mississippi are left struggling with the fallout of a series of devastating tornadoes.

Here are three stories to watch in politics and business this week:

The U.S. is skeptical that Putin will resort to nuclear attacks

The U.S. government stated they do not believe that Russia President Vladimir Putin will deploy nuclear weapons, despite Putin's announcement that he's moving nuclear weapons into Belarus.

NATO denounced the move, stating: "Russia's rhetoric is dangerous and irresponsible. NATO is vigilant and we are closely monitoring the situation. We have not seen any changes in Russia’s nuclear posture that would lead us to adjust our own. We are committed to protect and defend all NATO allies."

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with United Russia party fraction leader Vladimir Vasiliev at the Kremlin in Moscow, March 22, 2023. Sputnik/Gavriil Grigorov/Pool via REUTERS
Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with United Russia party fraction leader Vladimir Vasiliev at the Kremlin in Moscow, March 22, 2023. Sputnik/Gavriil Grigorov/Pool via REUTERS

White House National Security Council spokesman John Kirby told CBS News over the weekend there's been "no indication" that Russia has any intent to use its nuclear weapons inside of Ukraine.

A state of emergency in Mississippi

President Biden declared a federal state of emergency for Mississippi after deadly tornadoes took the lives of 26 people and left dozens more injured over the weekend.

"We will do everything we can to help," Biden said in a statement. "We will be there as long as it takes. We will work together to deliver the support you need to recover."

Honduras ditches Taiwan, partners with CCP

Honduras severed ties with Taiwan and decided to partner with the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).

In return, Honduras will get $2.5 billion in aid from the CCP, a move that the Taiwanese are calling little more than a bribe from Beijing.

Taiwan's Representative to the United States Bi-khim Hsaio criticized Honduras's move on Twitter.

A group of Honduran and Taiwanese pose for pictures during a gathering in support of the relations between Taiwan and Honduras, at National Taiwan University, in Taipei, Taiwan, March 25, 2023. REUTERS/I-Hwa Cheng
A group of Honduran and Taiwanese pose for pictures during a gathering in support of the relations between Taiwan and Honduras, at National Taiwan University, in Taipei, Taiwan, March 25, 2023. REUTERS/I-Hwa Cheng

"Regrettable that the Honduran government has betrayed Taiwan’s friendship for China," she wrote. "They will soon realize that whatever the CCP did to lure them will be nothing but empty promises and malign influence."

Biden has previously said that the U.S. would defend Taiwan if China would move to invade.

There also remains strong bipartisan support for Taiwan in Congress, where Republicans and Democrats have introduced legislation that would modernize the Taiwan Relations Act to include bolstering security assistance.

Kevin Cirilli is a Yahoo Finance contributor and a visiting media fellow at the Atlantic Council's Global China Hub.

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