JNJ - Johnson & Johnson

NYSE - Nasdaq Real-time price. Currency in USD
143.71
-0.85 (-0.59%)
As of 11:52AM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close144.56
Open144.32
Bid143.55 x 1000
Ask143.56 x 800
Day's range143.02 - 144.58
52-week range109.16 - 157.00
Volume3,383,809
Avg. volume11,875,277
Market cap378.869B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.72
PE ratio (TTM)22.43
EPS (TTM)6.41
Earnings date16 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yield4.04 (2.80%)
Ex-dividend date22 May 2020
1y target est164.17
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  • Bloomberg

    The More Covid-19 Vaccines, the Merrier

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The way the Covid-19 crisis ends is with vaccines — not a vaccine. More than one horse can win this race. Some of us might end up getting a shot of a more traditional vaccine, which uses parts of an inactivated virus to stimulate immunity. Others might get vaccines based on emerging technologies that use synthetic versions of the virus’s genetic code.One such novel candidate, based on RNA and made by Moderna, showed promising results in early human trials, though critics warned the evidence is preliminary. Meanwhile, a different prototype based on DNA made headlines for an experiment that showed it worked in monkeys.In the end, some vaccines might be extremely effective but harder to scale; others the opposite. Even a less-effective vaccine might work well enough to provide herd immunity in a wider population. Other vaccines might be more appropriate for health care workers, who have to risk exposure on the job, and need protection as soon as possible.Scientists have created more than 70 vaccine candidates so far. “If we end up with two, three, or four vaccines, that’s good, since we have seven billion people,” says Harvard vaccine researcher Dan Barouch, who led the development of one of the vaccines featured in recent news. His group began working on a vaccine in January, after the virus started spreading in China. There are good reasons for him and other scientists to be optimistic. “For Covid-19, it’s clear most humans who get infected recover … that alone shows the human immune system can eliminate the virus,” he says. That makes it a much easier target than HIV, which he calls unprecedented in the history of vaccinology for its ability to evade the immune system. And the SARS-Cov2 virus doesn’t have the fast mutation rate that makes flu viruses a moving target.Art Krieg, a physician and founder of Checkmate Pharmaceuticals, says he’s very optimistic that because the human immune system can successfully battle the virus, so will one or more of the many experimental vaccines. All vaccines have to provide a danger signal to “prime” the immune system into acting against an invader. In 1995, Krieg reported the discovery one of these danger signals — called CpG DNA — which has been used in several vaccines, including one for hepatitis B, and is in some of the experimental candidates against the virus that causes Covid-19.Next, the vaccine has to mimic the invader in order to get the immune system to create specific antibodies that target the intended enemy. Vaccine designers using genetic material (DNA or RNA) have to stimulate the immune system enough to generate those antibodies, but not so much that the immune system destroys the vaccine before it can complete its mission.The biggest driver of recent headlines (and stock market drama) was a vaccine produced by the Massachusetts-based company Moderna, which is based on synthetic genetic material identical to parts of the code carried by the coronavirus. The genetic material is RNA — the single-stranded cousin of DNA. (Other RNA vaccines are being studied by BionTech, Translate Bio, and Curevac.) The RNA tricks human cells into making proteins identical to the “spike” proteins the virus uses to penetrate human cells. And that, in turn, stimulates the immune system to make antibodies that will be ready to block that protein if the real coronavirus invades.The excitement about Moderna’s vaccine followed the release of data from a trial that involved 45 volunteers, though the company only described results for eight of them. Of the eight, all produced antibodies with the desired “neutralizing” property needed to attack the virus in the future. What happened to the other 37 people? Since this vaccine requires two doses, they probably just didn’t have that data yet, says Krieg.A similar concept is behind DNA vaccines. The one developed by Harvard’s Barouch made the news for a successful experiment in monkeys. Other DNA vaccines are already in early human trials, including candidates developed by Oxford University, Johnson & Johnson and the Chinese company CanSino Biologics.These DNA vaccines use synthetic strings of code for making the spike protein carried by the virus. In some of these, the synthetic DNA is injected alone, while in others, it rides into human cells inside a deactivated cold virus (called an adenovirus). The human cells transcribe the DNA to RNA, and then into the decoy spike protein used to create immunity to the real thing. While the prototype developed by Barouch’s group at Harvard can be given in two shots, the Oxford DNA vaccine and several others that use cold viruses confer immunity with just one shot, says Krieg. DNA and RNA aren’t our only options. Yet another vaccine concept, made by Dynavax, uses the spike protein itself and stimulates the immune system using a synthetic DNA danger signal — the CpG DNA. These protein-based vaccines would have to be produced in bulk in fermentation vats, which Krieg says is something the biotech industry is equipped to do.Krieg says all the novel vaccines work through the same well-established scientific principles, and are very likely to be safe. Still, he says, it’s well known that vaccines don’t work as well in the elderly and immunocompromised. Imperfect vaccines could still eradicate the virus through herd immunity but only if the bulk of the population gets vaccinated. Once the technical hurdles are overcome, there will be social hurdles — already, there are movements among anti-vaxxers to resist — but it’s not too soon to plan to surmount them.Barouch says the ordinarily competitive nature of science has changed, as everyone understands how much is at stake in terms of lives and economic damage. In retrospect, critics might be able to criticize approaches that didn’t work, but right now, we need all the ideas we can get.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Faye Flam is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. She has written for the Economist, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Psychology Today, Science and other publications. She has a degree in geophysics from the California Institute of Technology.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- With the coronavirus pandemic turning the world’s economy upside down, analysts and investors have a lot of questions, and companies are doing their best to answer them. So if it feels like earnings calls were extra long these past few weeks, that’s because they were. Among the 29 members of the Dow Jones Industrial Average who normally have earnings calls and have held one since the beginning of March, 22 companies ran longer than usual by an average of about 10 minutes.Johnson & Johnson executives were the most verbose, with the company’s April 14 earnings call stretching about 1 hour and 43 minutes. That was nearly 26 minutes longer than the average of Johnson & Johnson’s previous four earnings calls. Even Walmart Inc., which doesn’t consistently hold public earnings calls, held an hour-long one on Tuesday to discuss first-quarter results. Analysts are generally grateful to have the extra information, but they, too, are noticing the longer calls. “Sorry, I was just fixing myself some dinner,” joked JPMorgan Chase & Co. analyst Steve Tusa in the middle of Emerson Electric Co.’s April 21 earnings call, which took place in the morning but stretched on a bit. “This is a pretty comprehensive conference call you’re having here.” Emerson, which isn’t a member of the Dow, included presentations by its major business heads as well as the CEO, CFO and company president. All told, the call lasted more than 2 hours, about 45 minutes longer than the recent average. It’s probably wise to stockpile snacks ahead of the next round of calls in July. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.Elaine He is Bloomberg Opinion's data visualization columnist in Europe, focusing on business and markets coverage. Before joining Bloomberg, she was a graphics editor at the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Financial Times

    Johnson & Johnson stops selling talc-based baby powder

    Johnson & Johnson will stop selling its baby talcum powder in the US and Canada, where sales have dropped amid a wave of litigation claiming that the personal care product can cause cancer. The world’s largest healthcare company said sales of the powder had dropped 60 per cent in the past three years, as it had been hit with thousands of lawsuits and billions of dollars in damages at trial over the claims. Kathleen Widmer, chairman of North America for Johnson & Johnson’s consumer health division, said advertising from lawyers seeking new clients to sue the company had confused customers and caused sales to fall.

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