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EU agrees on 2050 climate neutrality without Poland

Poland has been left out of a 2050 climate neutrality agreement by the EU, after hours of summit haggling with three poorer eastern member states.

The Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland had demanded more funds for economic transition and support for nuclear power.

The former two eventually conceeded.

Having won a guarantee that nuclear energy would be recognized as a way for EU states to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

Poland, remained steadfast, though German Chancellor Angela Merkel said she was satisfied with the outcome.

(SOUNDBITE) (German) GERMAN CHANCELLOR, ANGELA MERKEL, SAYING:

"(And today) we had intense discussions and we can say that we know where we're going - namely that we want to reach climate neutrality by 2050. One member state, that is Poland, could not commit itself (today) to how the implementation (of this goal) should take place. And so we decided that we will return to it in June of next year (2020)."

Warsaw said it needs to reach climate neutrality at its own pace.

Poland relies on highly polluting coal for some 80% of its energy.

And demands more specific guarantees on how the phasing out of fossil fuels would be financed.

Before taking the plunge towards more ambitious climate goals.

This drama came a day after new European Commission leader, Germany's Ursula von der Leyen, proposed a $110 billion dollar investment plan.

That would push for net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by mid-century.

Something she called - Europe's "man on the moon moment".

The European Union is set to return to neutrality agreement discussions in June.